<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1289632567801214&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Get $15 off your first chewy order of $49 or more

    How to Brush Your Cat's Teeth

    This page may contain affiliate links, for which we earn a commission for qualifying purchases. This is at no cost to you, but it helps fund the free education that we have on our website. Read more here.

    350-cat-nose-and-mouth


    Alright, let’s be honest. Brushing your cat’s teeth probably sounds as appealing as giving your cat a bath. Both situations have the potential to lead to, not only a stressed-out feline, but an equally frazzled human. 

    Despite all of this, as a responsible cat lover, you know — just like people — good feline dental health leads to better overall health! Good dental hygiene can help avoid serious dental disease, and several other issues creating bad cat breath. 

    Don't "Brush-off" Your Cat's Teeth 

    If you're feeling like you're getting into the ballgame late, don't worry! That’s really the genesis to this article. Although, I tried to introduce both our family cats to pretty much everything, that was not the case when it came to brushing their teeth.

    The bright spot is you don’t have to brush their teeth every day (I will get into their schedule further down). I have two young kids, so you can probably imagine adding in two cats and myself (my wife is self-sufficient), is a lot of daily dental responsibility!

    How to Prepare Your Cat for Brushing Their Teeth

    Cat Yawning

    For most of us, the thought of putting on a finger-fitted toothbrush for a cat, or just using a typical pet toothbrush, and then sticking our hands in or near their mouth, seems like it will end in either getting bit or scratched. This can happen! And often does if you don't ease your cat into it.

    It's true that the earlier you start teaching your cat to enjoy getting their teeth brushed, the easier it will be. The older they are when you start may prove challenging, but with consistency, it will be worth your while. I know this because I didn't start brushing our cats' teeth until they were around three-years-old. 

    • Introduce teeth brushing early. (But if you haven't, it may just take a little more time.)
    • Be consistent.
    • Be patient.
    • Create a safe space.

    Remember, when you are introducing your cat to all things dental, be patient and thoughtful. It’s not natural for a cat to have a piece of plastic with bristles placed inside their mouth, so use their curiosity to gain their trust. 

    Equally important, is to find a place that creates a sense of calm. Whether you do it with them sitting on a blanket, towel, on a table, or you choose to hold them while brushing it’s in your best interest to create a safe environment that can be replicated each time.

    Introducing Your Cat to the Toothbrush

    Although I prefer a finger-fitted brush (because of the ease while holding them), there are a number of highly recommended standard pet toothbrushes that you may feel more comfortable with. The point of this stage is to simply introduce your cat to the toothbrush. 

      • Pick a good toothbrush, that's the right size for their mouth. 
      • Let them explore the toothbrush.
      • Don't introduce toothpaste yet.introducing finger tooth brush to cat
     

    Once you feel like your cat is at ease with the toothbrush being around their face, you will want to put the toothbrush to the side. Wait, what? I know it sounds counterintuitive, but before you put the toothbrush in their mouth, you will initially want them to feel comfortable having your finger act as the toothbrush. I know this doesn’t sound like a good idea in theory but trust me, it works.

    • Use your index finger to start massaging their mouth.
    • Gently slide your finger inside their lips.
    • Pay attention to your cat's mood.

    You want to start with your index finger and gently massage the side of their mouth at the oral commissures. That’s just Latin for where two objects join – and in this case, it’s the corner of the cat’s mouth where their upper and lower lips meet. That’s your way in!

    You will want to gently massage the area until it seems reasonable to slowly slide your finger in their mouth. You’re not going to shove your finger in there, but rather gently start rubbing the sides of their canines (those fang-like teeth). This will be the foundation for you to eventually move onto the toothbrush. 

    Cats teeth massage

    YouTube Video: Helpful Vancouver Vet

    During this process, always pay attention to your cat. Don’t ignore signs of agitation or discomfort; it will only create a negative association with the experience. If you need to "put a pin in it" and come back to the process later, then that’s what you should do. In all transparency, not all cats are open to having their teeth cleaned. So, if your cat’s personality is defiant, give it time. Remember, repetition is the mother of all learning. 

    If your cat is comfortable with you rubbing around their mouth, you can grab your toothbrush again. You still have no need for toothpaste at this point.

    • Start rubbing the toothbrush around your cat's mouth gently.
    • Gently transition onto your cat's front canines.
    • Use light and gentle strokes.
    • Limit time to the comfort level of your cat.
    • Reward them with their favorite treats. 

    Gently use the same tactic you would with your finger, but now insert the toothbrush. You are not necessarily looking to start brushing their teeth — this is the step where we want them to be comfortable with the toothbrush in their mouth. When you do begin to brush their teeth, it’s important to note that how you brush your teeth and how you brush your cat’s teeth is completely different. You need to use slow and light strokes. 

    Brushing without Toothpaste

    Brushing Your Cat's Teeth for the First Time

    This is the step where you will want to introduce toothpaste. There are various brush options and toothpaste for cats that you can find online. I prefer Petrodex Enzymatic Toothpaste because my cats like the taste. It also comes as a kit with an angled brush and finger brush. However, you may want to try different kinds of toothpaste to find the one your cat likes most and order a separate toothbrush. Below is another option we recommend. 

    Petrodex Dental Kit for Cats, Malt Flavor virbac enzymatic pet toothpaste H&H Pets Dog Toothbrush

     

    Petrodex Dental Kit
    Buy on Chewy | Buy on Amazon
    Virbac C.E.T. Enzymatic Toothpaste
    Buy on Chewy | Buy on Amazon
    H&H Pets Standard Finger Toothbrush
    Buy on Chewy | Buy on Amazon

    • Start with a small amount of toothpaste on your finger.
    • Let your cat taste initially.
    • Use your finger to rub around inside their mouth.

    You will want to put a little toothpaste on your finger first and let your cat taste it. It’s actually fun. Many times the toothpaste tastes like a treat for cats, so the task doesn't seem so daunting! 

    Tasting

     

    Then you will want to put a small amount on the toothbrush and start with their front canines. When you are brushing, it’s best to brush where the gum tissue meets the tooth.

    How long do you brush a cat's teeth?

    Let me just say that less is more! You only need to give a few strokes with the toothbrush. You may need or want to add more toothpaste as you make your way through their mouth. 

    toothbrush

    • Put a small amount of toothpaste on the toothbrush.
    • Brush where the gum meets the tooth.
    • Start with front canines.
    • Move to back molars.
    • You don't need to brush for very long.

    I prefer to do one side at a time. I start with the canines and then move back to the molars. And I repeat the process on the other side. The whole process should only take you a couple of minutes at most. 

    How Often Should You Brush Your Cat's Teeth?

    If you can clean your cat’s teeth daily, you are setting the bar. But, even if you are able to brush your cat’s teeth a couple of times a week, you are probably still ahead of the curve. So, let that be your goal! Don't be discouraged if you are periodically brushing your cat's teeth and feel you're not doing enough. Again, brushing your cat's teeth does not require a lot of time, so try to increase the number of times you brush each week, until you have a schedule that works for you!

    Why Brushing Your Cat's Teeth Helps Their Overall Health

    Proper care of our cat's teeth helps prevent a myriad of health issues and dental disease. If you find that your cat adjusts well to home tooth brushings, it's still important to still have their teeth checked and cleaned annually at your veterinarian's office. Some cats, particularly those with previous dental disease or stomatitis, underlying health conditions like kidney disease or diabetes, and senior cats, should have their mouths checked as part of an overall exam every six months.

    If your cat’s gums are already red and sore, they are missing teeth, unable to chew hard food, or have any drooling/pawing at the mouth, refrain from brushing their teeth at home until your veterinarian has given you the okay to do so. They may need a professional cleaning first, and then you can maintain that clean with brushing at home.

    What Causes a Cat to Have Bad Breath

    Potential causes of bad breath in cats and dogs other than dental issues, include:

    • Kidney disease
    • Liver disease
    • Lung disease
    • Foreign bodies stuck in the mouth (sticks are a very common culprit for dogs!)
    • Tumors within the mouth or throat (squamous cell carcinomas are both a painful and aggressive tumor type that can occur in the mouths of both cats and dogs)
    • Ulcers of the tongue or other tissues within the mouth
    • Out of control diabetes (a condition called ketosis)
    • And several others

    So, while bad teeth and periodontal disease do cause bad breath — and are, in fact, the most common causes of bad breath in cats and dogs — they are not the ONLY cause of bad breath.

    Watch out for worsening bad cat breath! If a change occurs, have it checked out by your veterinarian right away.

    Why is this important? Unfortunately, many pet owners assume that bad breath is only caused by an issue with their teeth (which is not the case, as explained above). And because of that, there can be some hesitancy by the owner that they will have to put their pet under anesthesia. We recommend before making any decisions about care, if you notice your pet's increasing bad breath (or any dental issues), contact your veterinarian to discuss options. 

    Hopefully, this tutorial is helpful for you when starting and maintaining your cat’s dental health. Brushing your cat's teeth can be a great bonding experience for you and your cat. And beyond the time it takes to get your cat used to the process, regular weekly cleanings will take very little time. Of course, if your cat is not a fan of regular brushings, make sure that at the very least, you have their teeth professionally cleaned under anesthesia once a year. 

    Related Articles:

    PODCAST: Much Ado About Brushing
    Tooth Root Abscess: My Cat's Face is Swollen
    Cat Enrichment: What To Do If Your Cat is Bored
    VOHC: A Seal of Approval
    Top New Year's Resolutions for Pet Lovers
    Your Cat and Diabetes: Everything You Need to Know
    New Call-to-action

    Topics: Cat Health, pet safety tips, cat teeth cleaning

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.