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Is It Legal to Break a Car Window to Save a Dog?

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Topics: Dog Safety, Summer Pet Safety Tips, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Dog, Signs of Heat Stroke, Heat Exhaustion in Dogs, Heat Stroke Risk Factors

BBQs, Sun, Water, and Fun - Oh My! Summer Pet Safety for Your Dog.

Come June, who among you isn’t ready for the sunshine, BBQs, fireworks, trips to the river, lake, beach, and all the other joys that summer brings?

Believe it or not, there is one group that likely isn’t ready…
your pets!

With a few simple steps you can help prepare your pets and keep them safe this summer. This article will serve as an overview of the summer hazards that commonly sicken, injure, and kill cats and dogs this time of year. Awareness is such an important part of prevention. So please, give this article a good read and be sure to share it with your pet-loving friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers. Here’s to a safe and wonderful summer for all – human and pet, alike!

Summer Pet Safety Tips:

  1. Summer carries dangers from heat, water, toxins, and an increase in injuries.
  2. Always consider your pet’s safety and comfort.
  3. Sometimes it’s better to leave your pet safe in the home, rather than exposed to danger.

HEAT

Though that beautiful glowing orb in the sky improves our collective mood and helps to sustain life on our planet, it can lead to a few significant problems for our beloved pets, too.
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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, flea treatment, High Rise Syndrome, Dogs, Safety, Cats, Summer, Heat Stroke, Pets, Swimming, Boating, Barbeques, Sunburn, Blue Green Algae, Snails, Paw Pad Burns, Fireworks, Slugs, Antifreeze, Blog

Heat Stroke: What can I do if I see a pet in a parked car?


We all know that heat kills pets, right?

You've likely read stories about dogs that have died of heat stroke after having been left in a car on a hot day. Maybe you even know someone who lost a pet to heat stroke as a result of leaving their pet in a parked car? But would you know what to do if you ever encountered such a situation?

Take these three scenarios, for example…

Scenario #1… You're walking by a parked car on a warm day. You notice, there under the dash, a dog panting away with big, wide-open, clearly distressed eyes. There are slobbery nose prints and fog on the inside of the window.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, Dog Emergency, Dogs, Cats, Summer, Heat Stroke, Pets, Cars, Signs of Heat Stroke, Blog, What can I do if I see a dog in a car on a hot day, Rescuing a dog in a locked car, Heat Exhaustion in Dogs

Dogs in Cars: Debunking Five Dangerous Misconceptions


Sadly there are still many erroneous myths and misconceptions out there surrounding the idea of leaving pets in parked cars. These contribute to dangerous practices that result in the heat stroke cases and deaths that my colleagues are seeing on a daily basis and that we’re all read about in the news and online all-too-frequently.

This article should debunk these misconceptions and put a stop to these dangerous practices. Use it to educate yourself and protect your pets, and share it to help educate others. The more people we can get to recognize the inherent dangers of these misconceptions and practices, the more injuries and deaths from heat stroke we can all help to prevent.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, Dogs, Safety, Cats, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Danger, Pets, Prevention, Blog

Heat Stroke In Dogs: What is it and when does it happen?


What Is Heat Stroke In Dogs?

When a dog’s body temperature rises over 104°F and his mechanisms for cooling himself – such as panting – become overwhelmed and stop working properly, heat stroke sets in.

Sadly it’s not just a dog’s thermoregulatory (“cooling”) system that fails in heat stroke. As the condition progresses and the body temperature rockets even further above 104°F, most body systems fail. Among them are the all-important neurologic, urinary, circulatory, and blood clotting systems. Once these systems begin to fail, the likelihood of recovery from heat stroke is very slim.

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Topics: Kids and Pets, Dogs, Safety, Cats, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Danger

Heat Stroke: How To Treat My Dog’s Heat Exhaustion or Heat Stroke?


In this article you’ll find an outline of the first aid steps you should take to treat a cat or dog suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

You’ll also find important warnings and principles of first aid for heat-related illnesses.

Please keep in mind that while many of the more mild cases of heat exhaustion can be successfully staved off with the basic first aid steps provided below, all cases of heat stroke (and many of the more severe cases of heat exhaustion) will require veterinary care following your initial first aid. When in doubt, just bring your pet for veterinary evaluation, as heat-related illnesses are nothing to be trifled with. These are cases where it’s truly better to be safe than sorry.

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Topics: Dogs, Safety, Cats, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Danger, Pets, Prevention

Heat Stroke: Is my dog at risk?


Along with the outside temperatures and humidity and the situations that people may put and leave their pets in – hot cars, exercise on hot days, etc. – there are several other pet-specific “predisposing” factors that can increase a pet’s risk for suffering from heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

If your cat or dog has one (or several) of the characteristics or conditions listed below they may be at increased risk of suffering from heat-related illnesses. Please take extra precautions on warm and humid days and be sure to speak with and work with your pet’s veterinary team to best manage your pet’s risk of suffering heat stroke.

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Topics: Dogs, Safety, Cats, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Danger, Pets, Prevention, Brachycephalic, Addison’s Disease, Persian, Bulldogs, Scottish Fold, French Bulldogs, Pekingese, Boxers, Himalayan, Shih Tzu, British Shorthair

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.