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Caring for Your Dog's Coat: Brushing, Combing, and Mats — Oh My!


Dog fur always seems to get everywhere — on your clothes, on the furniture, in your coffee, even little fur tumbleweeds that float across the floor. Keeping your dog brushed will help you minimize the layer of fur over everything and promote healthy skin and a shiny coat. But what kind of dog brush should you keep handy? This all depends on your dog's coat type. Read on for tips on how to pick the most effective brush for your dog.

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Topics: Puppy, Dog, canine care, Grooming, Giving a dog a bath, Skin problems, Dog Coat Care, Matting, Dog Fur, Dog Brushes

The Cone Zone: 14 Days in a Cone


The Cone. Cone of Shame. E-collar. Whatever you call it, your dog is bound to have to wear one at least once in their lifetime due to spay or neuter, an injury, or skin condition. Elizabethan collars (e-collars) help your pup heal by stopping them from licking, scratching, or rubbing the affected spot.

Elizabethan collars were named because of their likeness to ruffs popularized by Queen Elizabeth I in the Tudor period. While your pup doesn’t look as stylish as the Queen, it does protect them from licking, scratching, or biting areas they shouldn’t, promoting faster healing times.

My puppy Mary Berry, a mini Goldendoodle, celebrated National Spay Day by getting spayed! With a bunch of extra hugs and some tears (mine more than hers), I left her in the capable hands of our veterinarian. I picked her up about 6 hours later — loopy, sleepy, and wearing a cone. She was very excited to see us, and her cone was flopping around every which way.

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Topics: Puppy, Socialization, Dog, Surgery, Skin problems, E-collar

Skin Cancer Precautions – Even For Indoor-Only Pets


Sun-Induced Skin Cancer In Dogs & Cats

We’re all familiar with the role the sun plays in contributing to skin cancer in people, right? But are you aware that sun exposure can also lead to the development of skin cancer in cats and dogs? It’s true, and the most common type is called squamous cell carcinoma (which is also a common sun-induced skin cancer in people!).

While any cat or dog that spends any time outside (or lounging on a windowsill) on a sunny day is at risk, there are certain other factors that increase their risk. Some of these include:

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety tips, pet safety, Summer Pet Safety Tips, Dog, Sunscreen, Cat, Skin problems

Hot Spots – Your Dog Won't Stop Itching!


Got An Itchy dog?

Chances are, you've had a dog that's developed a “hot spot” at one point in time. Perhaps even many times — if your dog is unlucky enough to have allergies, fleas, or another condition that causes them to scratch a lot.

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Topics: Dog Health, dog fleas, Dog Skin Issues, Flea Allergies, Dogs, Dog Tips, Allergies, Hot spots, Skin problems

Shampoo For Your Pet – Which Kind Should You NOT Use?

 

Fido & Fluffy Need A Bath – Pick The Right Shampoo

When it comes to bathing your pets, it can be tempting to reach for whatever shampoo you might already have in your shower, or grab the dishwashing soap from your kitchen. While this may be ok every now and again, the regular use of human shampoos (even the “tear free” ones for babies) and dishwashing soaps can actually lead to worse skin problems for your pets.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety, Dog, Giving a cat a bath, Grooming, Pet Shampoo, Giving a dog a bath, Cat, Skin problems

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.