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The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 7 - Lights & Electrical Cords)


DAY 7: Light Strands & Electrical Cords

Though strands of Christmas lights can really add a beautiful holiday glow to your tree or house decorations, its important to also appreciate that they can cause a curious pet quite a shock and some pretty significant resulting health problems, too. And if chewed on, these tree adornments can even lead to a house fire.

Be aware

Pets that chew on electric cords ,can sustain burns on their tongues and elsewhere in their mouth. These pets may also develop a buildup of fluid within their lungs, as a result of the electrical shock. This fluid buildup within the lungs, that results from a cause other than heart failure, is known as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, it can lead to breathing problems, and it can be fatal, too.

The oral cavity burns these pets suffer from can result in significant pain and can cause them to go off their food. This scorched tissue is also at risk of becoming infected. If your pet chews through an electric cord and their burns are bad enough that they won't take food, they will need to be hospitalized for care and they may need to have a temporary feeding tube placed. These tubes can be lifesaving interventions, but they can be fairly costly too - with hospitalization for tube placement and the necessary nursing care often costing in the range of $1,000-3,000 (depending on the severity of their injuries and how well and quickly they respond to treatment).

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, holiday pet safety tips, Christmas pet hazards, Hiding, Electrical shock, Electrical Cords, Burns, Excessive drooling, Scorched tissue

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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