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Rodenticide Poisoning In Cats & Dogs — Why the Type Matters


Not all rat and mouse poisons kill the same way

Many cats and dogs are brought into veterinary hospitals in the fall and winter after having gotten into a rat/mouse poison (“rodenticides”). After all, this is a common time of year for rats and mice to try and seek shelter in people’s homes and businesses, so it’s a common time of year for people to be putting out rat and mouse poisons.

While most people know that rat and mouse poisons are dangerous for cats and dogs, what many people don’t realize is that not all rodenticides work (kill) the same way. Because of this, it’s vitally important that you pay attention to what you and your neighbors are putting in and around your homes, and that the veterinary staff or the people at animal poison control are told (or better still, shown) which rodenticide your pet got into if exposure happens.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, toxicity, Poison control, Blog, Outdoor cats, Dogs Outdoors

My Dog Ate Xylitol: What Should I Do and Who Should I Tell?


As xylitol is being used in an increasingly wide range and number of products, more and more dogs are getting sick from eating this “all natural” sugar substitute.

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Topics: Dog Health, toxicity, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Poison control

When A Safety Is Worth More Than Two Points: Super Bowl Pet Safety Tips


Denver v. Carolina!   Broncos v. Panthers!
Super Bowl Sunday is almost here!


Who’s excited? Who’s having people over? Who are you rooting for?

While it has yet to be decided whether Peyton and the Broncos can rule the day and win their third franchise Super Bowl, or if Cam and the Panthers will be able to put the cherry on top of an amazing (near perfect) season to win their first, I can tell you that all pet-owning football fans should be on the same side in at least one respect.

You see, regardless of who gets to hoist the Lombardi Trophy Sunday evening, the one thing everybody can agree on is that nobody wants to spend ANY part of the big game at the Animal ER and nobody wants to see their beloved pet suffer from any of the poisonings, illnesses, or injuries that are common on Super Bowl Sunday. Am I right?

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Topics: pet safety tips, pet safety, Cat Stress, Dog Stress, Poison control, Blog, Pet Suffocation

Antifreeze Poisoning In Cats & Dogs – Now Even Scarier


Update on Antifreeze!

With the cooler weather approaching, I want to take a moment to share an important update within the veterinary world and remind you of a common “cooler weather” pet poison.

Is your pet at risk?

  • Do you change your car's fluids at home?
  • Do you have a leaky car that drips on the pavement?
  • Do your pets have access to your driveway or garage?
  • Is your cat an outdoor cat and roams the neighborhood?
  • Does your dog roam your neighborhood?
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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety tips, toxicity in cats, Dogs, Cats, Antifreeze, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Winter pet hazards, EG toxicity

Homemade Playdough - salty and dangerous for pets


When looking for something fun and easy to do with kids at home many people turn to homemade playdough.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity in cats, Dog Emergency, Dog, Cat Emergency, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Digestive obstruction, Seizures, Digestive irritation, Neurological problems, Coma, Salt toxicity, Heart Problems, Homemade playdough

Antifreeze is Poisonous to Dogs and Cats


If you’re like most people, you likely don’t think about the antifreeze in your car very often. And you likely only change it, or have it changed, every few years. But if you’ve got pets (or children, or care about the environment), the antifreeze you and your neighbors have in your cars and garages is actually very important.

Ethylene Glycol – What Every Pet Owner Should Know

Most antifreezes contain ethylene glycol, a chemical compound that causes significant, often fatal, problems for both cats and dogs.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety, toxicity in cats, Dog, Excessive drinking, Antifreeze, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Blog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Excessive drooling, Staggering, Skin irritation, Winter pet hazards, Ethylene Glycol, EG toxicity, Loss of balance

The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 12 - Houseguests)


Day 12: Houseguests

I know, it seems a bit curmudgeonly to declare “houseguests” as a pet hazard. After all, it's Christmas! And isn't this holiday about nothing else if not spending it with friends, family, and loved ones?

It is indeed — both for you and your pets. From the perspective of the health and safety of your pets though, it truly is important for you to be aware of all the dangers that your friends, family members, and other loved ones will most certainly (albeit inadvertently) expose your pets to during this year’s Christmas festivities.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety, toxicity, Xylitol, holiday pet safety tips, Hepatic Lipidosis, Vomiting, Poison control, Christmas pet hazards, Pet safety and houseguests, Diarrhea, Batteries

Rat & Mouse Baits—Dangerous For Cats & Dogs... Know the signs


Many cats and dogs will be the first to take the bait

Each autumn and winter, there is a concerning rise of dog and cat poisonings due to rat and mouse poisons (rodenticides) that are seen in veterinary hospitals and animal ERs throughout the world.

With the declining temperatures and summer’s food bounty going away, rats and mice start seeking shelter and food in our homes, garages, sheds, and barns. To combat them, many people will put out rodenticides — chemicals and “baits” designed to kill rats and mice.

Unfortunately, cats and dogs will often be the first to take the bait. And as if that weren't enough, they can also be affected by eating poisoned rodents! Signs of rodenticide toxicity can be seen within hours to days, depending on the type of rodenticide used. Common clinical signs include:

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, toxicity in cats, Dog Emergency, Kidney Failure, poison control for dogs, Cat Emergency, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Poison control for cats, Breathing problems, Seizures, Rat Bait, Lethargy, Internal Bleeding, Coughing, Rodenticides, Vomitting

Lesser Known Pet Toxicities: Human Pain Relievers and Dogs Don't Mix


Nobody likes to see their dog in pain

Since lots of dogs unfortunately suffer from arthritis and other painful conditions (not sure if your dog is one - here's some ways to help know if your dog is painful) and nobody likes to see their dog in pain, accidental poisoning is one of the most common reasons people bring their pets in for an emergency veterinary visit or call animal poison control each year. Toxicity caused by human pain relievers is one of the most preventable pet toxicities. Just a little awareness and simple changes to routine will prevent the majority of pets from accessing and eating little pills. The toxic results of ingestion can include damaged red blood cells, gastrointestinal ulceration, and liver or kidney failure, among other things.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, medication, poison control center phone number, poison control number, medications, poison control for dogs, drugs, medicine, pet poison control free, poison control hotline, poison control center number, pet poison control, dog poison control, prescription drugs, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.