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Puppy Versus Paper Shredder: The Tale of Henri's Tail


Henri was just 10 months old when he encountered a powerful enemy that changed him and his owners forever.

The day of the accident, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was visiting a Tipp City, Ohio-based business where his mom and dad worked. With his charming personality, adorable puppy face, and handsome black-and-tan coat, Henri was the star of the show.

After making the rounds, he stretched out on a chair with his plumed tail draped over the edge of the seat — right in the path of the office’s paper shredder. Unfortunately, the machine was plugged in and set to “standby” mode.

Sensing a nearby object, the sharp teeth started turning and grabbed onto Henri’s fur. In seconds, his tail disappeared into the fierce mouth of the paper shredder.  

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, Pet emergency, office safety, 101 Tips

Dogs & Batteries – More Dangerous Than You Might Think


Dogs and Batteries — Yes, Really!

You might already know by now that dogs are experimenters and their mouth is the laboratory. What you might not be aware of though is that one thing dogs often like to "test out" are batteries. (Don't forget, they also readily gobble up cat poop, fishing hooks, and rocks... so are batteries really that big of a surprise?!?!)

Another thing you might not yet know is that while all batteries can pose serious dangers to dogs when chewed or eaten, there's one type of battery that carries an even greater risk for dogs (and kids) – the disc or "button" type batteries.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Vomiting, Digestive obstruction, Pet safety and houseguests, Pet emergency, Batteries, Lithium Battery, Hydrogen Peroxide

The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 4 - Batteries)


DAY 4: Batteries

Christmas and batteries just seem to go hand-in-hand, don't they? Among other things, they're in (or necessary for) many toys, digital cameras, watches, remote controls, and even those (annoying?) singing greeting cards. Heck, Santa even sometimes gives packs of batteries as stocking stuffers! Unfortunately though, batteries can pose a very significant danger to dogs – a danger that is likely more serious than you even know. Especially if they swallow certain types of batteries!

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Vomiting, Pet safety and houseguests, Pet emergency, Batteries, Lithium Battery

Which Bones Are Safe For Your Dog?


There are dangers, regardless of whether they are raw or cooked bones, big or small.

It's a myth that raw bones are OK but cooked aren't

Are there dogs who chew and/or eat bones without incident? Of course. BUT there are also plenty of dogs, who do so with incident, including plenty who had previously done so without. In fact, there were so many reported illnesses and deaths due to "bone treats" in 2017 that the FDA issued a warning to pet owners.

What kinds of problems do we vets see with dogs chewing or eating bones?

Plenty. This type of dog emergency is painful, distressing, and costly. Some are even fatal. Here’s a sample of the bone-chewing/eating problems commonly seen by vets and experienced by dog owners:

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Dog Emergency, holiday pet safety tips, Dog, Blog, Dog Treats, Dog Tips, Bowel Perforation, Digestive obstruction, Christmas pet hazards, Are bones safe for dogs, Safe pet treats, Safe dog treats, Pet Hazards at Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving Safety, Broken teeth, Digestive irritation, Deer antlers, Cooked bones, Digestive tract perforation, Raw bones, Pet emergency, Pork bones

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.