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Why Your Dog's Coat Gets Matted — and What You Can Do About It


Mat alert! Dog fur often becomes tangled and knotted around itself without frequent brushing, which is called matting. Mats occur frequently in many dog breeds with curly, fine, or double coats. In extreme cases, the dog's coat will become what groomers call "pelted" — when matting is very tight to the skin, preventing proper air flow.

Matting and pelting prevents proper temperature regulation, causes skin irritation, hides parasites like fleas or other nasties, and causes extreme discomfort and pain for the dog.

Mats are mostly preventable! Let's look at why your dog's coat is forming mats and things you can do to keep them at bay. We'll also talk about what your options are if your dog's coat is already matted. 

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Topics: Dog Skin Issues, Puppy, Dog, canine care, Grooming, Dog Husbandry, Dog Coat Care, Matting, Dog Fur, Dog Brushes

Caring for Your Dog's Coat: Brushing, Combing, and Mats — Oh My!


Dog fur always seems to get everywhere — on your clothes, on the furniture, in your coffee, even little fur tumbleweeds that float across the floor. Keeping your dog brushed will help you minimize the layer of fur over everything and promote healthy skin and a shiny coat. But what kind of dog brush should you keep handy? This all depends on your dog's coat type. Read on for tips on how to pick the most effective brush for your dog.

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Topics: Puppy, Dog, canine care, Grooming, Giving a dog a bath, Skin problems, Dog Coat Care, Matting, Dog Fur, Dog Brushes

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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