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Choosing Your Dog's Leash


When choosing what walking tools and supplies to outfit your new pup with, the variety of options seems endless! Leashes are an important training tool, and something that you’ll use almost every day — which means it’s important for you to find one that matches your needs and preferences.

You’ll see dog owners walking their pups on lots of different widths and lengths, styles, materials, and even different clasp and handle types. Which is best for you and your dog?

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Topics: Leashes, Loose-leash Walking, Puppy Training, Puppy, Walking on a Leash, Dog, Are retractable leashes safe, Dangers of retractable leashes, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, new puppy, puppy tips

Teach Your Dog the Automatic Sit


Imagine walking with your dog around town and coming up to a crosswalk at a busy intersection. Your dog sits automatically with no verbal cue or prompting from you when you stop at the curb — not only do you and your pup look like obedience rockstars, but your dog is safe since they aren’t walking straight out into traffic.

Now imagine you encounter a friend while on your walk around town. Instead of rushing up to them and jumping, your dog sits politely at your side and waits while you two humans stop and chat. This can be your reality with some easy and consistent training!

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Puppy Training, Puppy, Training, Walking on a Leash, Dog, Benefits of training, Sit & Stay

Dog Harnesses: Helpful Tools for Loose Leash Walking


Teaching your dog how to walk politely on their leash is a lot easier and safer if you use a body harness.

Not only is a dog who pulls against their collar while on leash hard to control, but they're also in danger of some major health risks! Dogs who pull on leash can suffer a collapsed trachea, nerve damage, and other neck and throat injuries. For brachycephalic breeds (short-skulled and flat-faced dogs like Pugs, Boxers, French Bulldogs, etc.) harnesses are best to prevent any pressure on the neck and throat and exacerbating their already delicate face and short nasal airway. Using a harness helps to prevent these injuries from occurring and can also help you in training your dog to walk politely on leash.

A harness is a great alternative to aversive collars, giving you better control with a large, strong dog without relying on pain and discomfort. Harnesses provide another option for dogs that tend to slip or back out of their collars, as it's harder to wiggle out of a body harness than a regular flat collar. 

There are many kinds of harnesses and it’s important that you find the right kind for you and your dog. Keep reading to find out more about all the options.

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Topics: Dog Training, Leashes, Dog Collars, Dog Harnesses, Loose-leash Walking, Dogs

Teaching Your Dog to Play Fetch (and Return)


There are three types of dogs in this world: dogs that don’t care about fetch, dogs that fetch but don’t retrieve, and Labradors.

Unless you have a Labrador or live in a perfect 1950s Pleasantville, (in which case you probably have a Labrador) you’ve most likely had to face the crushing reality that a lot of dogs don’t have the fetch instinct. 

Plenty of dogs will happily run after a thrown toy, but then refuse to bring it back — or they might pick up the toy and make you chase them around just for funsies. Other dogs are more interested in the hair between their toes than the fetch toy you’re trying to get them excited about. 

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Topics: Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Dog, Dog Walking, Dog Leash

6 Tips for Taking Your Dog Off Leash


Nearly every dog owner has the same worries about letting their dog off their leash: What if they don’t come back? What if they get injured?

It’s not hard to imagine the reasons for keeping a dog on a leash — safety from cars, other dogs, other people, wildlife, and potential hazards like rodenticides in public parks — but are there benefits to having your dog off-leash? There certainly can be! Here are a few of the benefits that dogs can experience when they're allowed to go (safely) off-leash:

 

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Topics: Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Dog, Dog Walking, Dog Leash

Loose Leash Walking


If your dog pulls on the leash whenever you walk, then those walks are neither healthy nor relaxing for either of you. Those walks aren’t safe either. When I see a  dog who pulls on his leash during walks, I also see it as a sign that he and his owner are not paying attention to each other. It takes two to pull, after all. Walking with your dog should feel like a walking meditation, not a battle.

Pulling on the leash can be very rewarding to a dog


The action of pulling doesn’t feel so bad at the time and it often gets them where they want to go. Any behavior as rewarding as pulling on the leash takes a lot of commitment from the owner to fix. But trust me, it can be fixed and it will be worth it.

Below are some important keys for preventing and correcting leash pulling.  If you have more than one dog, practice the following leash training techniques with each dog separately at first. Eventually you’ll be able to practice and walk them together more easily. Then everyone will have more fun.

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Topics: Leashes, Loose-leash Walking, Puppies, Dogs, Walking on a Leash, Dog Walking

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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