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Help Your Dog LOVE Their Spa Days


Warm water gently flows down the body. Strong, yet tender hands massage the perfect combination of soaps and conditioners from head to toe. Each hair is expertly styled—bringing out all the beauty that hides beneath. Finally, the nails are shaped, filed and finished to rival the best mani-pedis around. 

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Topics: Puppies, Dogs, Socialization, Anxiety in Dogs, Blog, Grooming

Finding A Dog Groomer Your Dog Will Love and Trust


Your dog and their groomer—a relationship of trust

Since the day you got your newest four-legged member of your family, you have (hopefully) been preparing them for the outside world and all the experiences that’ll come ahead. One of the more important aspects of their socialization is relationship building. Relationships with family, friends, their veterinarian, other dogs, maybe even a kitty or two. Another important bonding experience that they’ll most-likely have is with their groomer. After all, the dog/dog groomer relationship is based on two-way trust. Each have to be—not just comfortable with the other—they need to have confidence in each other. Neither the dog, nor the groomer, wants to have any fear whatsoever from the other. Remember, there’s a lot of personal space being invaded while your pup is getting all cleaned, cut and coiffed!

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Topics: Dogs, Socialization, Anxiety in Dogs, Blog, Grooming

Ear Infections Are Very Common—Drying Your Dog's Ears Helps


Ear infections are one of the most common reasons why people have to bring their dogs to the vet. And they tend to happen most often in the summer, when dogs are more likely to be swimming and getting baths... both high-risk opportunities for dogs to get water in their ears!

The vicious cycle of yeast, bacteria and infection

The reason why you want to clean and dry your dog’s ears after swimming or bathing is because the water that gets into their ears during these activities is likely to create a warm, moist environment within their ears that will allow for an overgrowth of the yeast and/or bacteria that are normally present on their skin and in their ears. This increased growth of yeast and/or bacteria will irritate and inflame your dog’s ears, starting a vicious cycle that will make the infection and pain even worse.

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Topics: Dog Health, Grooming, Ears, Ear Cleaning

How Often Should You Cut Your Dog's Nails?


Plenty of pet owners are a little intimidated by the thought of trimming their dog's nails — and a lot of dogs aren't too thrilled by the prospect either. Beyond the logistics of clipping roughly 20 nails on a squirming dog, there are still a ton of questions:

  • How often should you clip?
  • What tools should you pick up?
  • How do you clip your dog's nails without hurting them or making them bleed?

In this article, we'll tackle these common issues one at a time, everything from the frequency of nail trimming to making the process easier for you and your dog.

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Topics: Dog Health, Dogs, Grooming, Nails

Shampoo For Your Pet – Which Kind Should You NOT Use?

 

Fido & Fluffy Need A Bath – Pick The Right Shampoo

When it comes to bathing your pets, it can be tempting to reach for whatever shampoo you might already have in your shower, or grab the dishwashing soap from your kitchen. While this may be ok every now and again, the regular use of human shampoos (even the “tear free” ones for babies) and dishwashing soaps can actually lead to worse skin problems for your pets.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety, Dog, Giving a cat a bath, Grooming, Pet Shampoo, Giving a dog a bath, Cat, Skin problems

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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