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How to Help Your New Puppy Sleep Through the Night


While your new puppy’s sleep schedule might not (yet) be in sync with yours, there are still plenty of things you can do to help both of you get as much sleep as possible. For the first several nights and weeks, you should make peace with the fact that you’re just not going to get a full night’s sleep. But the time and dedication you put in now will help you reach that point sooner (before sleep deprivation makes you start speaking in tongues to shadow people). Check out the tips below so you and your puppy can get back to that deep REM sleep as soon as possible.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, Puppy, Dog, Food, Dog Food, new puppy, puppy tips

Why Your New Puppy Isn’t Eating and What You Can Do About It


Your  puppy is settling into their new home and you’ve picked out the best food you could find (and afford). Or maybe you’ve kept the food they were fed by their breeder or at the shelter. But for some reason your puppy has no interest in their meals.
 

This can be — and very well may be — a concerning sign in a puppy. And it’s a big concern in a very young or small puppy, as they have less ability to sustain themselves without enough calories. Read on to see why your puppy might not be eating and what to do about it.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, Puppy, Dog, Food, Dog Food, new puppy, puppy tips

The Truth About Avocado For Dogs & Cats


Like many others who have emailed us, you may be thinking that you should avoid avocados around your cats and dogs at all costs. There does appear to be conflicting information out there, doesn’t there?

Avocados seem to routinely show up on “Top 10 Pet Hazard” lists, yet there’s avocado in (at least) one brand of pet food. You’d be right for wondering “what gives?”

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, Food, Foods that aren't good for dogs, Myth Busters

Measuring Pet Food – When A Cup Is Not A Cup


While any container you can drink liquid out of can be called a cup, when it comes to feeding your pets, it is important to keep in mind that “a cup” is actually a defined unit of volume measurement.

Now it does get a bit confusing, since the 8 ounces in “a cup” refers to ounces of volume, rather than ounces of weight. And that confusion can be further compounded by the fact that the volume in a fluid measuring cup isn’t exactly the same as that in a dry measuring cup.

Fortunately though, those particulars aren’t really that important here (and I share a simple "work-around" below anyway). When it comes to your pet’s weight and their overall health, what is important is that an empty “Big Gulp” cup, an empty take out food container, and any other of the myriad empty "things" capable of holding food or water that people so frequently use to scoop their pet’s food are not the “cups” that we veterinarians and the feeding recommendations on the back of pet food bags are talking about. These measuring cups are.

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Topics: Dogs, Overweight Cat, Overweight Dog, Cats, Food, Dog Tips, Storing Kibble, Cat Tips

Recognizing and Helping Overweight and Obese Dogs


What do you think about your pet's weight? Be honest. Do you think that they're an appropriate weight? Do you think they're too thin? Too heavy?

Would it surprise you to learn that nearly 50 percent of the dogs, and nearly 60% of the cats in America are overweight or obese? This is according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, and based upon the results of their 2009 National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Study. What is perhaps even sadder, and will make the problem that much more difficult to combat, is that many owners were mistaken about their own pet’s weight.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Cat Diet, Dog DIet, Heat Stroke, Food, Exercise, Urethral Obstruction, How much should my cat eat, How much should my dog eat, Calories, Hepatic Lipidosis, Pancreatitis, Ideal pet weight, Obesity, Diabetes, Diabetic

Lesser Known Pet Toxicities: Grape, Raisin, and Currant Toxicity in Dogs


Grapes could be one of the scariest toxins for dogs because of the perceived ‘health’ of offering fruit as a treat. While grapes, raisins, and the related Zante currant are perfectly healthy snacks for us humans, they can be kidney-destroying, and therefore life-threatening, to some dogs.

At this point, we don’t know exactly what makes these foods toxic, and we don’t know exactly the number of grapes, raisins, or currants that must be eaten before a dog shows signs of toxicity. Also, it appears that not all dogs are susceptible to this toxicity, and there are currently no ways to predict which dogs are, and which aren’t. What we do know is that, in susceptible dogs, the ingestion of these common ‘people snacks’ can cause acute kidney failure. Kidney failure is an expensive condition to treat, and can cause long-term consequences – even death. So, while we in the veterinary world may not yet know everything there is to know about grape, raisin, and currant toxicity in dogs, we do know enough to strongly recommend that people never knowingly feed grapes, raisins, or currants to their dogs and that they take all reasonable and necessary steps to prevent their dog’s accidental exposure to them as well.

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, Kids and Pets, Dogs, Are Grapes Safe for Dogs, Grape Toxicity, Are Raisins Safe for Dogs, Currants, What are Good Training Treats for Dogs, Are Currants Safe for Dogs, Food, Blog, Foods that aren't good for dogs

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Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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