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Choosing Your Dog's Leash


When choosing what walking tools and supplies to outfit your new pup with, the variety of options seems endless! Leashes are an important training tool, and something that you’ll use almost every day — which means it’s important for you to find one that matches your needs and preferences.

You’ll see dog owners walking their pups on lots of different widths and lengths, styles, materials, and even different clasp and handle types. Which is best for you and your dog?

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Topics: Leashes, Loose-leash Walking, Puppy Training, Puppy, Walking on a Leash, Dog, Are retractable leashes safe, Dangers of retractable leashes, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, new puppy, puppy tips

How to Prevent Foxtail Injuries and Remove Foxtails From Your Dog


Until you have a dog, you’ll probably marvel at rolling fields of grass at sunset. But once you have a dog, that bucolic scene can look more like a hotbed of potential pain and injury from foxtails (also called “grass seed awns”).

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Walking, Children walking dogs, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Grass Seeds, Grass Seed Awn, Dog Booties, What's a foxtail look like, Foxtail, Hunting Dogs, Dog face protection

Teaching Your Dog to Play Fetch (and Return)


There are three types of dogs in this world: dogs that don’t care about fetch, dogs that fetch but don’t retrieve, and Labradors.

Unless you have a Labrador or live in a perfect 1950s Pleasantville, (in which case you probably have a Labrador) you’ve most likely had to face the crushing reality that a lot of dogs don’t have the fetch instinct. 

Plenty of dogs will happily run after a thrown toy, but then refuse to bring it back — or they might pick up the toy and make you chase them around just for funsies. Other dogs are more interested in the hair between their toes than the fetch toy you’re trying to get them excited about. 

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Topics: Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Dog, Dog Walking, Dog Leash

Lights for Dogs at Night and How to Safely Walk Your Dog in the Dark


Nighttime safety for dogs is important any time of year, but even more so as the days get shorter and the dark settles in during autumn and winter. When waning daylight forces more people to take their dogs on walks in low-light conditions, it’s important to raise awareness that the pre-dawn and post-dusk hours are more dangerous for dogs. Sadly, it’s not uncommon for dogs to get hit by cars or sustain other injuries resulting from decreased visibility.

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Walking, Benefits of training, Dog Behavior, Blog, Accidents with retractable leashes, Children walking dogs, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Self-illuminating dog collars, Walking your dog at night, Nighttime dog collars, Reflective leg bands for your dog, reflective gear for dogs, LED dog collar

6 Tips for Taking Your Dog Off Leash


Nearly every dog owner has the same worries about letting their dog off their leash: What if they don’t come back? What if they get injured?

It’s not hard to imagine the reasons for keeping a dog on a leash — safety from cars, other dogs, other people, wildlife, and potential hazards like rodenticides in public parks — but are there benefits to having your dog off-leash? There certainly can be! Here are a few of the benefits that dogs can experience when they're allowed to go (safely) off-leash:

 

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Topics: Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Dog, Dog Walking, Dog Leash

What You Should Know Before Taking Your Puppy to the Dog Park


Dog parks can provide excellent exercise and social interaction for most dogs, and even their owners! But not all dog parks are created equal. Certain parks aren’t safe (or fun) for every dog, and situations within the park can change quickly... even drastically. Depending on the type of dog and the type of person, the experience can vary wildly. Some dogs take to the new environment with ease, while others take longer to adjust. And some just aren’t going to take to it at all — not now, or ever.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Behavior & Training, Puppy Training, Puppy, Socialization, Dog, Vaccines, Vaccination, Dog Leash

Finding the Best Collar for Your Puppy


You’re preparing for a new puppy, and though it may not be one of the more exciting things on your new puppy checklist, you’re likely wondering what type and size of collar to get for your new fur bundle.
Maybe you’ve already stood in wonderment (and confusion?) in the dog collar aisle of your local pet supply store?

With so many different types of dog collars on the market, it can be difficult to know which kind is best for your new puppy. A standard neck collar works well to display your puppy’s identification and contact information should they become lost, but is it the best option when taking your puppy for a walk? From collars to harnesses, we’ll review the various options so that your puppy is best equipped for leash walking.

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Dog Collars, Dog Harnesses, Dog Walking, Dog Behavior, Dog Tips, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Collapsing trachea, Laryngeal Paralysis, Larpar, Slipped disc, Horner's Syndrome, Dog Neckwear, Kennel Cough, Wobbler Syndrome, Neck Collar

Retractable Leashes – Useful or Harmful?


On any given day you’re likely to see lots of retractable leashes in use. You may use one yourself, or might even be considering getting one?

What you may not appreciate is they are dangerous and can cause harm to both dogs and to people.

Here’s just a sample of injuries that retractable leashes have caused…

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Walking, Benefits of training, Dog Behavior, Are retractable leashes safe, Dangers of retractable leashes, Accidents with retractable leashes, Children walking dogs, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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