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Why Your New Puppy Isn’t Eating and What You Can Do About It


Your puppy is settling into their new home and you’ve picked out the best food you could find (and afford). Or maybe you’ve kept the food they were fed by their breeder or at the shelter. But for some reason your puppy has no interest in their meals.
 

This can be a concerning sign in a puppy, especially in a very young or small puppy. They have less ability to sustain themselves without enough calories compared to full-grown adult dogs. If your puppy is not eating much, not eating breakfast, or if you're not sure if your puppy is eating enough, read on for tips about what you can do.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, Puppy, Dog, Food, Dog Food, new puppy, puppy tips

Is Peanut Butter Good for Dogs?

 
If you’re looking for a high-value treat, a handy way to sneak some pills into your pooch, or something to stuff into an interactive feeder, you can’t do much better than peanut butter. Not only is peanut butter a great snack to place in interactive feeders for dogs, but the sight of a dog vigorously smacking their chops never gets old. 

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Topics: Emergencies, Dog Health, Calories, Diabetes, Blog, Dog Treats, Safe pet treats, Safe dog treats, Peanut butter, Diet

Xylitol in Sugar-Free Gum is Killing Dogs... You Can Help Stop it!

Getting Xylitol Out of Gum Would Help Thousands of Dogs

Xylitol is a "sugar alcohol" sweetener that's becoming an increasingly common sugar substitute all across the country. Though it's found in a great many products (700+ and counting!), sugar-free and "sugarless" gums are, by far, the most common source of xylitol poisoning in dogs. You can help change that.

With just a share and a signature, you can help #GetXylitolOut of gum and protect thousands of dogs each year. We've even found a dog-safer replacement sweetener that the gum campanies can use  it's called erythritol, and it may even be better for your teeth, too!

Now we can do more than just raise awareness about the dangers of xylitol. We can actually get rid of one of the biggest xylitol dangers to dogs! Please sign our Change.org #GetXylitolOut petition and read on to learn more about this problem and to see what else you can do to help.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol Gum, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Is Xylitol Safe, pet health

Finding the Best Collar for Your Puppy


You’re preparing for a new puppy, and though it may not be one of the more exciting things on your new puppy checklist, you’re likely wondering what type and size of collar to get for your new fur bundle.
Maybe you’ve already stood in wonderment (and confusion?) in the dog collar aisle of your local pet supply store?

With so many different types of dog collars on the market, it can be difficult to know which kind is best for your new puppy. A standard neck collar works well to display your puppy’s identification and contact information should they become lost, but is it the best option when taking your puppy for a walk? From collars to harnesses, we’ll review the various options so that your puppy is best equipped for leash walking.

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Dog Collars, Dog Harnesses, Dog Walking, Dog Behavior, Dog Tips, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Collapsing trachea, Laryngeal Paralysis, Larpar, Slipped disc, Horner's Syndrome, Dog Neckwear, Kennel Cough, Wobbler Syndrome, Neck Collar

Puppy Shots — What Vaccines Your New Pup Needs (and When)


Is it time to go to the dog park, or take a puppy class?

The places your new puppy is allowed to go and the other pups and people they can meet along the way is influenced, in part, by what vaccines they’ve had. So we've put together this overview of the "shots" (vaccinations) that puppies should have during their first several months of life, as well as the why and when. Take a peek and discuss with your veterinarian to ensure that your new pup is as protected as they can be from the conditions that can sicken or cause them (or even you) harm.

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Topics: Dog Health, Puppies, Dog, Vaccines

Anal Glands — Why Dogs Have Them & What To Do When They're A Problem


Does your dog have problems with their anal glands?

Unfortunately lots of dogs have problems with their anal glands. Some anal gland impactions get so bad that they become abscessed and rupture, causing pain for the dog, and quite a nasty mess for their people (as well as the costs associated with having the infection and abscess treated). So if anal glands are such a pain in the butt — both literally and figuratively — why do dogs have them and what can you do to help your dog if they suffer from regular anal gland problems?

See some of my recommended products and solutions at the end of the article.

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Topics: Dog Health, Dog, Anal Glands

Fast Food for Pets!—For When You Run Out of Dog or Cat Food


Ever run out of pet food and not know what to do?

While this seems like an obvious thing NOT to do, we've all had a close encounter of some kind, right?

I often see dogs and cats, who come in for a visit, for this very reason—because they're not feeling too well!

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Cat Diet, Dog DIet, Dog Food, Cat food

Rodenticide Poisoning In Cats & Dogs — Why the Type Matters


Not all rat and mouse poisons kill the same way

Many cats and dogs are brought into veterinary hospitals in the fall and winter after having gotten into a rat/mouse poison (“rodenticides”). After all, this is a common time of year for rats and mice to try and seek shelter in people’s homes and businesses, so it’s a common time of year for people to be putting out rat and mouse poisons.

While most people know that rat and mouse poisons are dangerous for cats and dogs, what many people don’t realize is that not all rodenticides work (kill) the same way. Because of this, it’s vitally important that you pay attention to what you and your neighbors are putting in and around your homes, and that the veterinary staff or the people at animal poison control are told (or better still, shown) which rodenticide your pet got into if exposure happens.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, toxicity, Poison control, Blog, Outdoor cats, Dogs Outdoors

How to Figure Out Which Dog is Having Diarrhea or Pooping in Your House


Whose poop is this anyway...

If you've got more than one dog (or cat) at home, odds are good that you've been faced with the "whose poop is this?" question at some point. Right? Whether you're needing to know because someone is having diarrhea, or because one of them is pooping on your carpets, figuring out which pet is having "bowel problems" is always the first step to figuring out why.

Fortunately there's a quick and easy trick to help you figure out whose is whose, and it involves something that you likely have in your home right now (or can very easily, and inexpensively, grab at the store)... crayons!

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Topics: Dog Health, Dog, Blog, Crayon Shavings, Arthritis in dogs, Diarrhea, Multi-dog household, Bowel issues

Safer Home Cleaning Products When You Have Pets


Choosing Cleaning Products When You Have Pets

It has been said that cleaning a house with pets is like brushing your teeth while eating Oreos — both are fruitless endeavors. That said, it’s still important to do (the first one, that is) at least every now and again, especially because you have pets. 

Pets live close to the floor and carpeting; they lick windows, flooring, frankly most any surface (repeatedly!), so making sure our cleaning products are free from harmful toxins is important.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety, Respiratory problems, Dog-friendly products, Cat-friendly products

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.