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Delaying a Spay: Dog Behavior While "In Heat"


Sometimes dog owners decide to wait to spay or neuter their dog for a variety of reasons. Even for dog owners who were planning on having their dog spayed or neutered sooner rather than later, the current coronavirus pandemic has thrown a wrench in those plans. Many veterinarians are postponing elective surgeries such as spaying and neutering, as they need to save surgical supplies, personal protective equipment, and minimize interactions to adhere to social distancing protocols.

No matter the reason, it's important to know what kind of behavior changes you might see as your dog hits sexual maturity. Especially if you have a female dog going into heat, you'll want to prepare for what that means and have supplies on hand to make your (and her) life easier. Read on for our tips on how to know if your dog is going into heat and what you should do.

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Topics: Dog, Dog Health & Safety, Spay & Neuter

What Kind of Peanut Butter is Safe for Dogs?


For the most part, peanut butter can be awesome for dogs and most dogs LOVE it! Peanut butter is great as an occasional "high value" treat, it’s useful for hiding pills, and it can even be used to distract your dog while giving them a bath or trimming their nails.

While most peanut butter brands are safe for dogs, not all types of peanut butter are safe and not all amounts of peanut butter are safe, either.

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Topics: Xylitol, Dog, Peanut butter, Dog Health & Safety

Bloat in Dogs: Signs, Symptoms and Treatment

 
If your dog’s stomach is bloated, or if they’re anxious, pacing, or repeatedly trying to vomit with no luck — or with just a bunch of saliva coming back up — they are likely suffering from Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV), also known as "Stomach Torsion," or “Dog Bloat.” 

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Topics: Stomach Bloat, Torsion, Dog Emergency, GDV, Bloat, Dog, Dog Health & Safety

3 Simple Steps to Choose the Best Chews for Your Dog


Your dog is going to chew — it’s just a part of being a dog. And it’s quite an important part, too! Whether they’re a puppy or an adult dog, all dogs need to chew. Puppies chew when they’re teething or just to explore the new world. Then they continue through adulthood to keep their masticatory (chewing) muscles strong, their teeth clean, and their brain engaged.

Safe Chew Toys: Important things to know and consider

Chewing is good for your dog’s mental and physical health, so it’s important that you provide them with plenty of safe and appropriate things to chew on. Fail to do so and they’ll come up with their own chew “toys,” like your most expensive pair of shoes, the legs of your dining room chairs, the nearest electric cord, or even your arm!

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety, Puppies, Dog toys, Dog Health & Safety

How Can I Tell If My Dog Is In Pain?


Nobody wants to see their dog suffering and in pain. Sometimes it can be very difficult to know for sure whether or not your dog is in pain. Sure, sometimes it’s quite obvious — a noticeable limp, large cut, or observed trauma, such as being struck by a car. But other times your dog’s signs of pain can be far more subtle. It’s at these times that people often need guidance on what to look for to know if their dog is in pain.

Signs That Could Indicate Pain in Dogs

Some dogs can be quite stoic and do a good (though detrimental) job of hiding and “living with” their pain. But that’s not what we want for our dogs, right? Fortunately, there are lots of signs you can look for that might indicate your dog is experiencing pain.

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Topics: Dogs, Signs of Pain, Pain management, Dog Health & Safety

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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