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Safer Cleaning Products For Your Pets


Choosing cleaning products when you have pets

It has been said that cleaning a house with pets is like brushing your teeth while eating Oreos — both are fruitless endeavors. That said, it’s still important to do (the first one, that is)—at least every now and again, especially because you do have pets. 

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, pet safety, Respiratory problems, Dog-friendly products, Cat-friendly products

Is Your Dog Quiet...Maybe Bored?


Is your dog reserved? The reason could be one of these three things 

“My dog is more quiet than usual?” “He’s more reserved.” “He just seems bored.” These are all fairly common questions, concerns, and statements from dog owners during veterinary visits.  

But is it always boredom or “getting older” that causes a dog to be more reserved, quiet, or to slow down?

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Health, Environmental Enrichment, Pain, Dog Stress, Feeding Bowls, Dog-friendly products, Dog toys

Snail & Slug Bait – Bad For Pets – What You Can Use In Your Garden Instead


Like to garden? Hate snails and slugs? Have pets?
Read this...

Most snail and slug poisons contain a compound called metaldehyde, which is also extremely poisonous to cats and dogs. Metaldehyde kills snails and slugs by causing them to dehydrate (it does this both by disturbing their ability to produce their protective mucus coating and by causing them to swell). In cats and dogs it has a much different effect, an effect which can be quite devastating and even fatal!

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Topics: toxicity, travel with pets, Snails, Outdoor cats, Dogs Outdoors, Dog-friendly products

How to Help An Older Dog with Arthritis and Other Mobility Problems


Arthritis and Dogs: A Common and Treatable Problem

Our dogs are living longer these days, which is unequivocally great! With advancing years though it’s common to see a host of medical and cognitive problems develop in aging dogs. One of the big ones, and one which can often be the easiest (yes, that’s right, I said “easiest”) to deal with is when dogs start to have problems getting up and getting around. Fortunately, helping your aging, arthritic dog with such mobility issues doesn’t mean you have to remodel your house or move to a single-story rancher. Helping them and improving their quality of life also needn’t be backbreaking (or bank-breaking) for you, and it isn’t even all about medications! There's lots of simple, inexpensive, and effective things you can get and do to improve your aging, arthritic dog's mobility.

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Topics: Dog Health, Dogs, medication, Pain, Arthritis in dogs, Dog-friendly products, Mobility, Aging

Do Dogs Need Sunscreen?


Just like people, dogs can get skin cancers that can be affected by prolonged or repeated sun exposure

As with many questions though, the answer to the question of whether or not to apply sunscreen to your dog isn’t exactly straightforward. Whether or not your dog needs sunscreen can be influenced by many different factors. Including, amongst others…

 

  • How much time your dog spends outside, and during what part of the day?
  • Where do you live? (factors: altitude; hours of daylight; etc.)
  • What color is your dog’s coat?
  • How thick and full is their coat?

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Topics: Dog Health, Summer Pet Safety Tips, Cancer in Dogs, Sunscreen, Dog-friendly products

Why Sticks Are Not 'Free' Toys For Dogs


Think sticks are good, free toys for dogs? Read this.

Do you throw sticks for your dog to fetch? Do you let your dog chew sticks? Lots of people do, and lots of dogs love to fetch and chew sticks, right? You see it all the time at the park, on the beach, and in yards. I personally get nervous though when I see dogs chewing and chasing sticks, and I know that many of my veterinarian colleagues and our technical support staff do, too. Do you know why? It’s because we see the results of dogs chewing and chasing sticks!

Here's just a sample of the types of injuries that sticks commonly cause:

  • Splinters in a dog's tongue and/or gums
  • Punctures of the roof of a dog's mouth, or even their throat
  • Impalement in a dog's eye
  • Penetration of a dog's chest, with resulting damage to their heart and/or lungs

Every year many dogs suffer significant pain and injuries from sticks, and that some dogs even die from their stick-related injuries. It’s true – and it happens far more frequently than you might expect. Want some proof? See the many stories at the end of this article.

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Topics: pet safety, Dogs, Safety, Chasing, Throwing, Chewing, Sticks, Impalement, Dog-friendly products, Playing Fetch

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.