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Help! What Should I Do if My Dog Bloats? Treatment for Bloat, Torsion, and GDV in Dogs


If you’ve read my other articles on GDV/Bloat in dogs – Understanding Bloat, Is My Dog at Risk of Bloat?, and Signs of GDV/Bloat in Dogs – you might be wondering if there is anything you can do at home? Sadly, the answer truly is… not really and, certainly, not reliably.

If you suspect GDV/Bloat, your dog needs to be brought for IMMEDIATE veterinary evaluation. Some people talk about giving certain over-the-counter medications to your dog in the earlier stages of GDV/Bloat, but honestly, doing so can make matters worse and the time it takes to do so may just be the difference between your dog living and dying. So, unless you are very familiar with this condition, and your veterinarian has instructed you otherwise, don't bother with any over-the-counter medications at home… just proceed directly to professional veterinary evaluation and treatment.

Even if you're concerned about the costs of appropriately treating a case of GDV/Bloat (more info on that in a minute), your dog should still be brought to the vet if you suspect this condition. If confirmed, and appropriate treatment cannot be authorized - for financial or other reasons - your suffering dog can be humanely euthanized at the vet's office, rather than left to languish and suffer the miserable death of GDV/Bloat. Please, don't trifle with this condition. Your dog deserves better.

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Topics: Torsion, Treatment for Bloat, Dog Emergency, GDV, Bloat, Treatment for GDV, Gastropexy

Help! My Dog's Stomach is Bloated! Signs of Bloat, Torsion, and GDV in Dogs


Bloat, torsion, and GDV can affect any dog and these conditions can be fatal, so it is important to be aware of these conditions as well as prepared for what to do in case of a GDV/Bloat emergency.

This current article will help you recognize and understand the signs of GDV/Bloat in dogs. This will be a very frank, honest, and, at times, seemingly "cold" conversation about this condition. Presenting it in this way though is truly the best way to help you and your dog, and it's far better for you to know and face this information now, rather than once GDV has already happened and you and your dog are at the Animal ER. So, without further ado, let's jump right in…

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Topics: Signs of Bloat, Stomach Bloat, Torsion, Dog Emergency, GDV, Bloat

Is My Dog at Risk for Canine Bloat, Torsion, and GDV?


The short answer to the question in the title is "yes"

But it is relative, and the "short answers" are often not the best.

While every dog owner should be aware of GDV, it is true that there are certain dogs - either because of their breed, lineage, general disposition, or possession of one or more of the other "predisposing factors"—who are at higher risk of suffering from it. If your dog fits any of these descriptions, be sure to read all of my GDV/Bloat articles and be extra alert. Again, what's most important here is to appreciate that any breed and any size of dog can suffer from GDV—so every dog owner should educate him or herself!

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Topics: Stomach Bloat, Torsion, Dog Emergency, GDV, Risks for GDV, Bloat, Gordon Setter, Standard Poodle, Basset Hound, Irish Setter, St. Bernard, Weimaraner, Great Dane, Boxers, Bernese Mountain Dog, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Blog

Dogs & Gorilla Glue® – More than just a sticky situation! (Time-lapsed video)


Gorilla Glue® is an incredibly strong glue known for its industrial holding power and versatility, even in wet conditions and regardless of the surfaces to be bound. It easily bonds wood, stone, metal, ceramic, foam, glass and more. Because this glue is often found in many households, Gorilla Glue® ingestion is a common emergency in dogs and is a very serious medical condition. If swallowed, any amount of this glue can expand to a size that may cause an obstruction of your dog’s stomach where emergency surgery would be necessary.

This time-lapse video, “When Gorilla Glue® Gets Wet,” shows  what happens when Gorilla Glue is eaten by a dog — which, given its sweet taste, happens far more often than you might think.

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, Dog Emergency, Dogs, Gorilla Glue, Video, polyurethane glues, gorilla super glue, super glue ingestion, super glue safety, isocyanate glues, Blog

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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