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List of Essentials to Build an Emergency Preparedness Kit for Pets


If and when disaster strikes, the last thing you want is to scramble for supplies.

Whether you have to hunker down or evacuate to safety, there won’t be much time to worry about finding food, water, and other necessities — and that's if the store shelves haven't been picked clean already.

So it’s vital that you not only have an emergency plan but also an emergency kit — for you and your dog or cat. Hopefully, you will never have to use this kit for the pets in your family. But you will feel a lot better knowing that you have what you need, even if you never need it.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Dog Emergency, Cat Emergency, Pet First Aid Supplies, Emergency Preparedness for Pets

What to Know If You Want to Give Your Dog CBD


Is it a cure-all or snake oil?
 

If you have spent any time researching cannabis for dogs, and specifically cannabidiol (CBD), you have probably found yourself wondering whether these products are safe, and even if they will offer any real benefits for your pained, anxious, or elderly dog.

The simple story about CBD is that there is no simple story about CBD. Though CBD is a non-psychoactive chemical derived from cannabis that won’t get people or animals high like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), it still falls into both a medical and bureaucratic black hole where it can be nearly impossible to extract definitive information.

But we have done our best to stare into the CBD abyss and pull out as much as possible to help you decide whether it might be good for your dog. As you’ll soon see, vets are placed in a difficult position when talking about these products, but you will hopefully walk away from this article with enough information to help you make a more-informed decision.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Emergency, Dog, Warning Signs, Pet First Aid, Anxiety in Dogs, Pain management, Foods that aren't good for dogs, Arthritis in dogs, Marijuana toxicity, marijuana

Marijuana, Cannabidiol & Dogs: Everything You Want (And Need) To Know


As of 2017, more than half the states in the country have enacted some form of marijuana legalization and more are expected to follow. But as perceptions about legal weed dramatically shift in the country, it forces us to address the elephant in the room — or, in this case, the dog in the room.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Emergency, Dog, Warning Signs, Pet First Aid, Foods that aren't good for dogs, Marijuana toxicity

Bloat in Dogs: What It Is, the Symptoms, and Treatment

 
If your dog’s stomach is bloated, or if they’re anxious, pacing, or repeatedly trying to vomit with no luck — or with just a bunch of saliva coming back up — they are likely suffering from Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV), also known as “Dog Bloat.” 

It’s important that you recognize this condition and act quickly. GDV is painful and distressing for your dog, and it will be fatal if they are not brought in for treatment as quickly as possible.

Any dog — of any breed, age, or size — can suffer from GDV, and not every dog suffering from GDV has an obviously distended or hard stomach. It’s very important that you don’t miss the critical window to get your dog to the vet. Dogs with Bloat can be saved, but only if they receive prompt and appropriate veterinary care.

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Topics: Stomach Bloat, Torsion, Dog Emergency, GDV, Bloat

Xylitol: The "sugar-free" sweetener your dog NEEDS you to know about


Xylitol: More Dangerous Than Chocolate, Yet Less Well Known About

Do you know what xylitol is? Are you (fully) aware of the danger it poses to dogs? You wouldn’t be alone if you answered “no” to either, or even both of these questions. In our ongoing Pet Safety Awareness survey over 50% of the respondents weren’t aware of xylitol or the danger it poses to dogs until they took the survey! By comparison, you’d be hard pressed to find a dog owner who isn’t aware that chocolate can be toxic to dogs. Right?

Yet xylitol can be far-more-dangerous to dogs than chocolate! The picture below shows the minimum amount of dark chocolate that could cause death in three different weights of dog — compared to the minimum number of pieces of xylitol-containing sugar free gum that could have the same devastating effect.

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Topics: Dog Safety, toxicity, Dog Emergency, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol Gum, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Is Xylitol Safe, Blog, Seizures, Liver Failure, Hypoglycemia

Homemade Playdough - salty and dangerous for pets


When looking for something fun and easy to do with kids at home many people turn to homemade playdough.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity in cats, Dog Emergency, Dog, Cat Emergency, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Digestive obstruction, Seizures, Digestive irritation, Neurological problems, Coma, Salt toxicity, Heart Problems, Homemade playdough

Which Bones Are Safe For Your Dog?


There are dangers, regardless of whether they are raw or cooked bones, big or small.

It's a myth that raw bones are OK but cooked aren't

Are there dogs who chew and/or eat bones without incident? Of course. BUT there are also plenty of dogs, who do so with incident, including plenty who had previously done so without. In fact, there were so many reported illnesses and deaths due to "bone treats" in 2017 that the FDA issued a warning to pet owners.

What kinds of problems do we vets see with dogs chewing or eating bones?

Plenty. This type of dog emergency is painful, distressing, and costly. Some are even fatal. Here’s a sample of the bone-chewing/eating problems commonly seen by vets and experienced by dog owners:

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Dog Emergency, holiday pet safety tips, Dog, Blog, Dog Treats, Dog Tips, Bowel Perforation, Digestive obstruction, Christmas pet hazards, Are bones safe for dogs, Safe pet treats, Safe dog treats, Pet Hazards at Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving Safety, Broken teeth, Digestive irritation, Deer antlers, Cooked bones, Digestive tract perforation, Raw bones, Pet emergency, Pork bones

Police Hero or Dog Rescuer? Both!

We animal lovers know the feeling when your pet is sick and you feel helpless.  Well, imagine if your dog is struggling to breathe, desperately gasping for what could be his last breath while you're otherwise helplessly racing to get him to the vet!

One Texas woman didn’t have to imagine this horrific scenario — it actually happened to Carolina and her 13-year-old dog, Scrappy, who had recently been diagnosed with Laryngeal Paralysis.

She "put the pedal to the metal" and was stopped by a patrolling Dallas police officer, who by the way has a series of (crime) prevention tips on YouTube - a kindred spirit for us at Preventive Vet - anyway, he didn't miss a beat. He grabbed Scrappy and took both of them to the Animal ER, stat! Likely saving Scrappy’s life, and definitely saving Carolina quite a bit of distress and anxiety!

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Topics: Dog Emergency, Dog Behavior, Dog Roar, Laryngeal Paralysis, My dog sounds hoarse, My dog is coughing, Larpar, Raspy breathing, Breathing problems, Respiratory problems, My dog is gagging often, Police Hero, Dog Rescuer

In Your Own Yard: Dogs and Poisonous Mushrooms


Don’t forget to check your yard for mushrooms each year, especially during a wet Spring or Autumn.

Mushrooms can kill dogs, and they can do so quickly!

Many dogs are sickened and killed each year after eating poisonous mushrooms. And depending on the type of mushroom and the size of your dog, it may not even take much to send you and your pooch rushing to the Animal ER.

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Topics: poisonous plants for dogs, Dog Emergency, Dog, Dog Walking, Poison control, Blog, Hunting Dogs, Ataxia, Amanita mushrooms, Seizures, Mushroom identification, Poisonous mushrooms for dogs

Dogs & Gorilla Glue® – A Pet Owner's Harrowing Experience


As a vet, I've seen the results of dogs eating Gorilla Glue and other polyurethane glues first hand. The stomach obstruction caused can be devestating, even fatal. It's the reason we've shared the dangers of polyurethane glues for some time now on our site, but it's the stories pet owners send us that really help to underscore just how important it is to take steps to keep these glues well out of your pets' reach.

Here's what Samantha C. shared with us:
"My dogs also got into this glue this week. They are still at the vet's recovering from surgery. My boxer had a basketball-sized amount removed from his stomach, and my Siberian Husky had a softball-sized amount removed. We were quoted $2K for their surgeries (total). They ate the glue in a fit of panic after I accidentally locked myself out of my apartment. They could hear me outside, and just freaked. They jumped up on a shelf in the laundry room, which they normally NEVER go into, and ate it."

We thank Samantha for sharing her story so that others may avoid a similar emergency. It can so easily happen to anyone! The effects of the common canine trait of "eat first, ask questions later," and why they find this type of glue so enticing are demonstrated in this time-lapse video.

        
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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, Dog Emergency, Dogs, Gorilla Glue, Video, polyurethane glues, gorilla super glue, super glue ingestion, super glue safety, isocyanate glues, Blog

Looking to keep your dog happy, healthy, and safe?

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Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.