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Will Your Dog Enjoy And Do Well In Daycare?


What do you picture when you imagine dog daycare? Groups of dogs romping and running, happy tails and wide open-mouthed doggie grins, and snuggle buddies relaxing after a morning of fetch and fun? This idyllic picture is what most dog owners assume dog daycare must be like for their pups — and for the most part, it can be!

You might be thinking about whether your dog will benefit from joining a dog daycare but not sure if they'll be a good fit. Or you might be wondering what it means when your dog fails a daycare trial. Or what if your previously-daycare-loving dog gets dismissed from daycare altogether? Does this mean you have a "bad" dog? Not at all!

Well-run dog daycares consider carefully what dogs will fit in with their existing play group and work hard to ensure all dogs in their care are having a good time. Safety is the top priority for these groups, but emotional and behavioral well-being is another thing that should always be considered — for your dog and for the others in the group. There are some management and training techniques that can be utilized in a group environments, but some behaviors are incredibly difficult to train or manage in a large play group. 

Let's look at what canine temperaments do best in a daycare environment and what behaviors might mean that your dog will do better in a different set up.

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Topics: Puppy, Dog, Exercise, dog boarding, Dog park, dog daycare

Choosing the Best Daycare for Your Dog


Dog daycares have become a mainstay for dog owners across the United States, growing in popularity since they first popped up in the mid-1990s. For many dog owners, dog daycare gives their dog a safe place to exercise during the day while they're at work and provides much needed mental enrichment and companionship that dogs wouldn't be getting by themselves at home.

But how do you know which daycare to choose? With increased popularity, more and more people are getting in on the trend, and there are lots of options and styles available, from the large franchised "brand-name" daycare to the dog daycare your neighbor started in their home.

The dog daycare and boarding industry is under-regulated, so it’s important you find a daycare where your dog will be safe, happy, and well cared for. There are a few things to consider when interviewing different dog daycares, including the style of daycare, staff to dog ratio, staff experience and training, cleaning procedures, dog handling and training methods ... and more!

Before exploring different daycare options, first think about whether your dog will actually enjoy going to daycare. Check out this article for more information on how to tell if dog will enjoy and do well in a dog daycare.

Read on to learn what to look for and what to ask a prospective doggy daycare.

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Topics: Puppy, Dog, Exercise, dog boarding, Dog park, dog daycare

Finding a Boarding Facility or Pet Sitter for Dogs: Where to Start and What to Ask


Bringing a dog into your life often means that trips out of town can become a little more complicated. Sometimes you can’t bring your dog with you, sometimes you don’t want to bring them with you, and some dogs simply don’t want to go with you — at least not all the time. Where do you leave your dog when you’re away? This is usually a tough question, especially if you can’t find someone you know who has the time (or experience) to care for your pet. On the other hand, Internet pet sitting services have made it easier than ever to find a sitter, but not all sitters are created equal. And many people prefer to board their dogs at their vet or with another reputable facility.

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Topics: Dogs, travel with pets, holiday safety, Travel, pet sitting, treatment authorization, pet health, pet sitter, dog boarding

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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