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Is Peanut Butter Good for Dogs?

If you’re looking for a high-value treat, a handy way to sneak some pills into your pooch, or something to stuff into an interactive feeder, you can’t do much better than peanut butter. Not only is peanut butter a great snack to place in interactive feeders for dogs, but the sight of a dog vigorously smacking their chops never gets old. 

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Topics: Emergencies, Dog Health, Calories, Diabetes, Blog, Dog Treats, Safe pet treats, Safe dog treats, Peanut butter, Diet

Think Twice About Letting Your Dog or Cat Free-Feed

Grazing...Good or Bad?

Many dog and cat owners find it convenient to keep their pet’s food bowl filled and accessible so their little friend can eat whenever they want. Unfortunately, while this may be convenient (in the short term), it's actually a bad practice that deprives people of important opportunities to mentally stimulate their pets, monitor their health and comfort, and can even lead to the development of some significant, costly, and quite inconvenient medical or behavioral conditions. So while "free feeding" may seem like a good way to feed pets in today's hectic lifestyles, doing so can actually cost you more time (and money) than the preferable alternative of meal feeding. Read on to see why.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Obesity, Diabetes, Dog Food, Cat food

Is Peanut Butter Safe For Dogs? Please Beware – Some Could Be Deadly!

If you're like many people, you might want to give your dog some peanut butter as an occasional treat. Or you might want to use peanut butter as a trick or reward to get your dog to take their medications. In many cases this is perfectly fine (so long as it's not in excess, as too much can cause pancreatitis and/or contribute to obesity).

However, with the introduction of a few unique lines of peanut and other nut butters onto the market (see list below) the answer to the question of whether or not it’s safe to give even a small quantity of peanut butter to your dog is no longer a straightforward one. Why? Because of the sweetener that’s been used to replace the sugar in these peanut and other nut butters. That sugar substitute is called xylitol. And while it's "all natural" and non-toxic to people, xylitol is extremely hazardous to dogs.

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Topics: Emergencies, Dog Health, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol, Pancreatitis, Diabetes, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Blog, Dog Treats, Seizures, Safe pet treats, Peanut butter, Hypoglycemia, Hepatitis

Recognizing and Helping Overweight and Obese Dogs

What do you think about your pet's weight? Be honest. Do you think that they're an appropriate weight? Do you think they're too thin? Too heavy?

Would it surprise you to learn that nearly 50 percent of the dogs, and nearly 60% of the cats in America are overweight or obese? This is according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, and based upon the results of their 2009 National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Study. What is perhaps even sadder, and will make the problem that much more difficult to combat, is that many owners were mistaken about their own pet’s weight.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Cat Diet, Dog DIet, Heat Stroke, Food, Exercise, Urethral Obstruction, How much should my cat eat, How much should my dog eat, Calories, Hepatic Lipidosis, Pancreatitis, Ideal pet weight, Obesity, Diabetes, Diabetic

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Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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