<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1289632567801214&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
New Call-to-action

Is Your Pet Too Bony? You Don't Know? – Try This Backbone Test


Take a second and try this right now
 
– Run your hand down your pet's back. Start up by the base of their neck and gently run your fingertips down the length of their spine, towards their tail. I know it’s a strange request, but bear with me. You’ll see why it’s important shortly.

How easily can you feel your pet's backbone? 

If those bones (they’re called the vertebral bodies and processes) are very prominent and easy to feel, then your pet may have decreased muscle mass and one of a host of the underlying conditions that can lead to such muscle loss.

 

Some of the conditions and problems that can result in decreased muscle mass in cats and dogs include:

Read More

Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Ideal pet weight, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Pet Diet

Dog or Cat Has Diarrhea? Here's What You Can Do At Home.


Diarrhea is one of the most common problems that brings both cats and dogs to the vet.

Loose stools aren’t any fun for your pet, and having to clean up the resulting messes and get up in the middle of the night to let your pet out to relieve themselves isn’t very much fun for you either. So what can you do and how can you best help your pet when their stools aren’t exactly right?

Of course the answer depends on what else is going on with your pet and what the likely cause of their diarrhea is.

If your pet is otherwise acting normally — normal energy, normal appetite, no vomiting, etc. — they're up-to-date on their vaccines, aren't very young or old, don’t have any significant pre-existing medical conditions — Addison’s disease, kidney failure, etc. — and there's no blood, straining, or foreign material associate with their diarrhea  then it’ll likely be ok to try and “ride out” your pet’s diarrhea for 24-36 hours.

Read More

Topics: Kidney Failure, Cats, Dog, Addison’s Disease, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Diarrhea, Bland Diet

Measuring Pet Food – When A Cup Is Not A Cup

We all drink from some sort of cup everyday, but just because we call it cup, does not make it a true measurement of volume. Why is this important? Because when it comes to your pet’s weight and their overall health, the myriad of empty containers you may frequently use to scoop their food are not the “cups” your veterinarians are talking about. 

Read More

Topics: Dogs, Overweight Cat, Overweight Dog, Cats, Food, Dog Tips, Storing Kibble, Cat Tips

Urban Coyotes - Keeping Your Pets Safe


We have had quite a few coyote sightings recently in our neighborhood here in Portland. Just this past week my dog, Wendy, and I were followed by one while out for our early morning stroll. 

Fortunately, I knew not to turn and run, and I recalled that it is best to make one’s self “as large and as loud as possible” to scare a coyote away. The coyote did eventually retreat, but not fully, and he continued to watch us while we walked — backwards — to the safety of our home.

That was one bold coyote!

Apparently, this is what happens as coyotes get more comfortable and lose their natural fear of people, and it would appear that it is happening in many parts of the country, even in and around big cities.

This got me thinking, what could or should I have done differently during this encounter? And, most important, what should we and our neighbors be doing to dissuade coyotes from coming onto our street and into our neighborhoods in the first place? I learned some very interesting things during my research — things that I feel all pet owners and parents of small children should know.

Read More

Topics: pet safety tips, pet safety, Blog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Wildlife, Rabies

Antifreeze is Poisonous to Dogs and Cats


If you’re like most people, you likely don’t think about the antifreeze in your car very often. And you likely only change it, or have it changed, every few years. But if you’ve got pets (or children, or care about the environment), the antifreeze you and your neighbors have in your cars and garages is actually very important.

Ethylene Glycol – What Every Pet Owner Should Know

Most antifreezes contain ethylene glycol, a chemical compound that causes significant, often fatal, problems for both cats and dogs.

Read More

Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety, toxicity in cats, Dog, Excessive drinking, Antifreeze, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Blog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Excessive drooling, Staggering, Skin irritation, Winter pet hazards, Ethylene Glycol, EG toxicity, Loss of balance

Pet Safety – When Holiday Houseguests Come to Visit


Gifts, holiday foods, and food preparation materials aren’t the only dangers your pets are likely to face during the holiday season. Along with the presents, wrapping, and large meals common this time of year, this is also often a time for a revolving door of house visitors and overnight guests. And whether those guests are neighbors and friends popping in briefly from down the street, or friends and family coming to stay from across the country, many will inadvertently bring with them toxins and other pet hazards that could ruin your holiday and deplete your bank account. With some important awareness and some simple precautions, you’ll be able to welcome your friends and family warmly and with open arms, without compromising your pet’s safety and well-being.

Read More

Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Lilies, Xylitol, holiday safety, Cats, chocolate toxicity in dogs, Dog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Christmas pet hazards, Pet Hazards at Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving Safety, Christmas pet dangers, Pet safety and houseguests, Poinsettias

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.