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What You Should Know About Flying With Dogs or Cats in a Plane's Cargo Hold

 
On June, 2016, United Airlines flight 1859 landed in Phoenix with a dead Yorkshire Terrier, Diamond, in its cargo hold. Official cause of death was complications due to “cardiac arteriosclerosis.” A month earlier, Pinkerton was also found dead when United Airlines flight 0722 landed in Phoenix — the cause of death in that case was listed simply as “heart failure.”

Those are but two deaths out of a total of nine that United Airlines reported to the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2016, the most of any airline that year. All airlines are required to make these “animal incident reports” of death or injuries to animals on their flights. United reported 23 incidents (deaths and injuries) in total, but they weren’t the only airline to have pets die on their planes.

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Topics: Crate Training, How to Travel with Dogs, travel anxiety, Heat Exhaustion, Travel, Brachycephalic, Traveling with your cat, Anxiety in Dogs, Traveling with your dog, Anxiety in Cats, Acepromazine

Brachycephalic Syndrome – Owners of Flat-Faced Dogs Beware!


Have you seen the viral post that’s been going around this summer written by a woman in England who lost her adorable French bulldog to Heat Stroke? As you might imagine, this story and the events it describes saddens me… but not only for the reason you might imagine.

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Topics: Dog Health, Brachycephalic, Breathing problems

Heat Stroke: Is my dog at risk?


Along with the outside temperatures and humidity and the situations that people may put and leave their pets in – hot cars, exercise on hot days, etc. – there are several other pet-specific “predisposing” factors that can increase a pet’s risk for suffering from heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

If your cat or dog has one (or several) of the characteristics or conditions listed below they may be at increased risk of suffering from heat-related illnesses. Please take extra precautions on warm and humid days and be sure to speak with and work with your pet’s veterinary team to best manage your pet’s risk of suffering heat stroke.

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Topics: Dogs, Safety, Cats, Heat Exhaustion, Summer, Heat Stress, Heat Stroke, Danger, Pets, Prevention, Brachycephalic, Addison’s Disease, Persian, Bulldogs, Scottish Fold, French Bulldogs, Pekingese, Boxers, Himalayan, Shih Tzu, British Shorthair

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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