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What You Should Know About Flying With Dogs or Cats in a Plane's Cargo Hold

 
On June, 2016, United Airlines flight 1859 landed in Phoenix with a dead Yorkshire Terrier, Diamond, in its cargo hold. Official cause of death was complications due to “cardiac arteriosclerosis.” A month earlier, Pinkerton was also found dead when United Airlines flight 0722 landed in Phoenix — the cause of death in that case was listed simply as “heart failure.”

Those are but two deaths out of a total of nine that United Airlines reported to the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2016, the most of any airline that year. All airlines are required to make these “animal incident reports” of death or injuries to animals on their flights. United reported 23 incidents (deaths and injuries) in total, but they weren’t the only airline to have pets die on their planes.

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Topics: Crate Training, How to Travel with Dogs, travel anxiety, Heat Exhaustion, Travel, Brachycephalic, Traveling with your cat, Anxiety in Dogs, Traveling with your dog, Anxiety in Cats, Acepromazine

Why You SHOULDN’T Use Acepromazine For Cats and Dogs With Fireworks or Thunderstorm Fears


Scaredy Cats and Frightened Fidos

A heartbreakingly large number of cats and dogs suffer terrible fear and anxiety from fireworks displays and thunderstorms.

Unfortunately, many of these pets are still given a medication called acepromazine (or as it’s more commonly called… “Ace”) in an effort to help them through these terrifying events.

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Topics: Summer Pet Safety Tips, anti-anxieties for dogs, 4th of July, Lost Pet, Fireworks, Anxiety in Dogs, Blog, Anxiety in Cats, Sedatives, Noise Phobias, Acepromazine, Thunderstorms

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Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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