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Grisha Stewart, MA, CPDT-KA, KPACTP

Grisha Stewart, MA, CPDT-KA, KPACTP

Grisha Stewart is an author, international speaker, and dog trainer who specializes in dog reactivity. She owns Ahimsa Dog Training in Seattle, which has earned many awards, including Best of Western Washington. Grisha is the founder of the Behavior Adjustment Training (BAT) program, a rewards-based and force-free way of effectively rehabilitating reactive dogs and empowering them to live with confidence and joy in society. You can learn more about BAT and see Grisha’s videos and books on her Empowered Animals website.

Recent Posts

Loose Leash Walking


If your dog pulls on the leash whenever you walk, then those walks are neither healthy nor relaxing for either of you. Those walks aren’t safe either. When I see a  dog who pulls on his leash during walks, I also see it as a sign that he and his owner are not paying attention to each other. It takes two to pull, after all. Walking with your dog should feel like a walking meditation, not a battle.

Pulling on the leash can be very rewarding to a dog


The action of pulling doesn’t feel so bad at the time and it often gets them where they want to go. Any behavior as rewarding as pulling on the leash takes a lot of commitment from the owner to fix. But trust me, it can be fixed and it will be worth it.

Below are some important keys for preventing and correcting leash pulling.  If you have more than one dog, practice the following leash training techniques with each dog separately at first. Eventually you’ll be able to practice and walk them together more easily. Then everyone will have more fun.

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Topics: Leashes, Loose-leash Walking, Puppies, Dogs, Walking on a Leash, Dog Walking

The Difference Between Clicker Trainers and Trainers Who Just Use Clickers


Clicker trainers use a clicker to shape a behavior – that is to say, they use the clicker to help and encourage a dog to work his own way through a behavior to the desired effect. This makes the dog responsible for his own learning. Other trainers use the clicker, but they do a lot of luring – using food or another object that the dog will follow to “walk” the dog through the behavior to the desired effect, thereby removing the need or incentive for the dog to fully engage their brain and work through the behavior themself – and just use the clicker to mark the behavior.

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Topics: Dog Training, Well-behaved Dogs, Shaping Behavior, Behavior & Training, Clicker Training, Dog Trainers, Dogs, Clickers

An Introduction to Clicker Training


Good dog trainers often use a small box called a clicker. The clicker makes a distinctive clicking sound when you press on it. This sound tells your dog “Yes, that is what I want you to do,” and it promises her a reward for a job well done. The clicker marks the exact moment she has done what you like. If you don’t like using gadgets, your dog is afraid of the clicker or you can’t use a clicker for some other reason, you can use a marker word, like “YES” instead of the clicker. You can also use a hand signal or the flash of a penlight if your dog is deaf. I will assume you are using a clicker below, but if you are using something else to mark the behavior, just use it in the places where I say to click.

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Topics: Dog Training, Shaping Behavior, Behavior & Training, Clicker Training, Puppies, Dogs, Luring Behavior, Targeting, Capturing Behavior

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

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