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Dr. Jason Nicholas (Dr. J)

dr jason nicholas
As President and Chief Medical Officer of Preventive Vet, Dr. J is a man on a mission. He’s a dog-and-cat lover, husband, father of two and former ER and general practice veterinarian obsessed with keeping your pets safe, healthy and out of harm’s way. Just like Preventive Vet, the pet-expert collective he founded in 2011, Dr. J strives for a world where all pet owners are empowered to keep their pets happy, healthy and free from preventable suffering.
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Recent Posts

How to Prevent Foxtail Injuries and Remove Foxtails From Your Dog


Until you have a dog, you’ll probably marvel at rolling fields of grass at sunset. But once you have a dog, that bucolic scene can look more like a hotbed of potential pain and injury from foxtails (also called “grass seed awns”).

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Walking, Children walking dogs, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Grass Seeds, Grass Seed Awn, Dog Booties, What's a foxtail look like, Foxtail, Hunting Dogs, Dog face protection

What Kind of Peanut Butter is Safe for Dogs?


For the most part, peanut butter can be awesome for dogs and most dogs LOVE it! Peanut butter is great as an occasional "high value" treat, it’s useful for hiding pills, and it can even be used to distract your dog while giving them a bath or trimming their nails.

While most peanut butter brands are safe for dogs, not all types of peanut butter are safe and not all amounts of peanut butter are safe, either.

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Topics: Emergencies, Dog Health, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol, Pancreatitis, Diabetes, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Blog, Dog Treats, Seizures, Safe pet treats, Peanut butter, Hypoglycemia, Hepatitis

10 Everyday Activities That Can Land Your Dog in the Vet or ER

 
It’s been said that what you don’t know can’t hurt you, which is a silly thing to say, especially if you’re talking about your dog.

If you’ve read anything on Preventive Vet before, you’ll know that some of the biggest dangers to your dog are the things that you're not aware of yet. After all, you can't prevent what you're not aware of!

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Topics: pet safety tips, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Chewing, Pet Suffocation, Chip Bags, Dog toys, puppy proofing

Popular Dog Chews That Are Actually Dangerous to Dogs


Dogs have an innate desire and need to chew. Unfortunately, they’re not always great at picking the best things
to chew on. This is where you come in. 

It can sometimes feel like there are as many types of chews and chew toys as there are dogs to chew them. And just about everyone has a personal pick for their dog, no matter what they hear to the contrary.

The truth is, there are some types of chews and chew toys that are best avoided if you want to keep your dog safe. Even if you decide that you still want to give your dog the following chews and toys, you should at least know the inherent dangers and risks.

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Topics: pet safety tips, Chewing, Playing Fetch, Dog toys

Finding a Boarding Facility or Pet Sitter for Dogs: Where to Start and What to Ask


Bringing a dog into your life often means that trips out of town can become a little more complicated. Sometimes you can’t bring your dog with you, sometimes you don’t want to bring them with you, and some dogs simply don’t want to go with you — at least not all the time. Where do you leave your dog when you’re away? This is usually a tough question, especially if you can’t find someone you know who has the time (or experience) to care for your pet. On the other hand, Internet pet sitting services have made it easier than ever to find a sitter, but not all sitters are created equal. And many people prefer to board their dogs at their vet or with another reputable facility.

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Topics: Dogs, travel with pets, holiday safety, Travel, pet sitting, treatment authorization, pet health, pet sitter, dog boarding

Potty Training Problems for Puppies and How to Prevent Accidents


Potty training is certainly no walk in the park — though it may involve some! Every puppy is different, and everybody’s living situation and schedule is different, too. Just as there’s no “one size fits all” recipe for potty training puppies, there's also a whole range of potential reasons why your pup might not be picking up on this important life skill as quickly as you were expecting (and hoping).

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Topics: Puppy Training, Puppy, Dog, Potty Training, new puppy, puppy tips

Playing Tug of War Without Encouraging Aggression in Dogs


Does tug of war make dogs aggressive?

You might have heard that playing tug of war with your dog, especially a puppy, puts them on the path toward aggression. If you’ve heard this, you’ve heard wrong. 

Playing tug of war with a dog will not necessarily cause them to become aggressive. How you play tug of war might lead to aggressive behaviors, but it’s remarkably easy to stay on the right path. Why would you want to? Well, playing tug of war with your dog can be extremely beneficial for both of you.

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Topics: Play & Environment, Dogs, Dog Behavior, Dog toys, aggression in dogs, how to play with your dog

Teaching Your Dog to Play Fetch (and Return)


There are three types of dogs in this world: dogs that don’t care about fetch, dogs that fetch but don’t retrieve, and Labradors.

Unless you have a Labrador or live in a perfect 1950s Pleasantville, (in which case you probably have a Labrador) you’ve most likely had to face the crushing reality that a lot of dogs don’t have the fetch instinct. 

Plenty of dogs will happily run after a thrown toy, but then refuse to bring it back — or they might pick up the toy and make you chase them around just for funsies. Other dogs are more interested in the hair between their toes than the fetch toy you’re trying to get them excited about. 

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Topics: Dog Safety, Loose-leash Walking, Behavior & Training, Dog, Dog Walking, Dog Leash

Lights for Dogs at Night and How to Safely Walk Your Dog in the Dark


Nighttime safety for dogs is important any time of year, but even more so as the days get shorter and the dark settles in during autumn and winter. When waning daylight forces more people to take their dogs on walks in low-light conditions, it’s important to raise awareness that the pre-dawn and post-dusk hours are more dangerous for dogs. Sadly, it’s not uncommon for dogs to get hit by cars or sustain other injuries resulting from decreased visibility.

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Walking, Benefits of training, Dog Behavior, Blog, Accidents with retractable leashes, Children walking dogs, Dog Leash, Retractable Leash, Self-illuminating dog collars, Walking your dog at night, Nighttime dog collars, Reflective leg bands for your dog, reflective gear for dogs, LED dog collar

List of Essentials to Build an Emergency Preparedness Kit for Pets


If and when disaster strikes, the last thing you want is to scramble for supplies.

Whether you have to hunker down or evacuate to safety, there won’t be much time to worry about finding food, water, and other necessities — and that's if the store shelves haven't been picked clean already.

So it’s vital that you not only have an emergency plan but also an emergency kit — for you and your dog or cat. Hopefully, you will never have to use this kit for the pets in your family. But you will feel a lot better knowing that you have what you need, even if you never need it.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Dog Emergency, Cat Emergency, Pet First Aid Supplies, Emergency Preparedness for Pets

Looking to keep your dog happy, healthy, and safe?

10 Tips eBook by Dr. Jason Nicholas

Take a look at these 10 Tips... your dog will thank you!

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.