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Colin Rigley

Colin Rigley
Colin Rigley is a Content Writer/Editorial Strategist for Preventive Vet who has more than a decade of experience in journalism, content production, and sleeping on a tiny sliver of the bed because the animals are sprawled across the rest of it. He’s an avid writer, photographer, traveler, and semi-professional doofus who has been a member of the Preventive Vet team since 2017. He lives in Seattle with his wonderful girlfriend; two cats who graciously let him wait on their every need; and three-legged, coated Mexican hairless street dog, which is a really complicated answer to the question “What kind of dog is that?”

Recent Posts

How to Find Non-Toxic Dog Toys and Tell If a Toy is Safe

 
You may have read scary reports about toxins such as lead turning up in dog toys, or shady manufacturing processes for dog chews and toys brought in overseas from places like China. But there's one thing you probably haven’t heard: How to tell whether the dog toy you just bought, or are about to buy, might be toxic.

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Topics: pet safety tips, Chewing, Toxicity in dogs, Playing Fetch, Dog toys

What You Should Know About Flying With Dogs or Cats in a Plane's Cargo Hold

 
On June, 2016, United Airlines flight 1859 landed in Phoenix with a dead Yorkshire Terrier, Diamond, in its cargo hold. Official cause of death was complications due to “cardiac arteriosclerosis.” A month earlier, Pinkerton was also found dead when United Airlines flight 0722 landed in Phoenix — the cause of death in that case was listed simply as “heart failure.”

Those are but two deaths out of a total of nine that United Airlines reported to the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2016, the most of any airline that year. All airlines are required to make these “animal incident reports” of death or injuries to animals on their flights. United reported 23 incidents (deaths and injuries) in total, but they weren’t the only airline to have pets die on their planes.

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Topics: Crate Training, How to Travel with Dogs, travel anxiety, Heat Exhaustion, Travel, Brachycephalic, Traveling with your cat, Anxiety in Dogs, Traveling with your dog, Anxiety in Cats, Acepromazine

The Top 10 Halloween Dangers for Dogs


Ah, Halloween; the time of year when no one is allowed to say that you can’t dress up as a superhero while eating enough sugar to put yourself into low-Earth orbit. For you, Halloween might be a fun reprieve from normal clothes, as well as a candy-fueled kickoff to the holidays. But for a dog it presents a new batch of hazards. Here are the Top 10 Halloween dangers for dogs you need to watch out for.

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, Dogs, Xylitol Dogs, canine chocolate toxicity, Toxicity in dogs, Blog, Pet costumes, Dog costumes, Halloween, Trick or Treat

Teaching Your Puppy to Stop Jumping


What could possibly be more adorable than a happy, bouncing puppy, amirite?

But most would agree that a bouncing 20, 30, or 50-pound adult dog is decidedly less cute.

Lots of puppies greet people by jumping. This is because dogs greet other dogs by sniffing each other’s faces… and other regions. When your puppy is bouncing like a fluffy little wind-up toy, they want to get up high enough to greet you properly. It’s no surprise that most people are happy to oblige their little ball of energy, scoop them up, and enjoy a few puppy kisses. But this becomes less cute with an adult dog. It might even stop being cute when they're still a puppy, like on those days when you only want to get through the front door without being accosted.

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog, Dog Behavior, new puppy, puppy tips

What to Know If You Want to Give Your Dog CBD


Is it a cure-all or snake oil?
 

If you have spent any time researching cannabis for dogs, and specifically cannabidiol (CBD), you have probably found yourself wondering whether these products are safe, and even if they will offer any real benefits for your pained, anxious, or elderly dog.

The simple story about CBD is that there is no simple story about CBD. Though CBD is a non-psychoactive chemical derived from cannabis that won’t get people or animals high like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), it still falls into both a medical and bureaucratic black hole where it can be nearly impossible to extract definitive information.

But we have done our best to stare into the CBD abyss and pull out as much as possible to help you decide whether it might be good for your dog. As you’ll soon see, vets are placed in a difficult position when talking about these products, but you will hopefully walk away from this article with enough information to help you make a more-informed decision.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Emergency, Dog, Warning Signs, Pet First Aid, Anxiety in Dogs, Pain management, Foods that aren't good for dogs, Arthritis in dogs, Marijuana toxicity, marijuana

Bringing Your Dog to Work, How to Do It Safely


Many companies now allow their employees to bring dogs to work, and more workplaces are doing the same. According to the 2015 Society for Human Resource Management survey, 8 percent of American workplaces allowed employees to bring pets to work, which was up from 5 percent that had such a policy two years earlier. 

Amazon, for example, has not only opened its own downtown dog park, but “more than 2,000 dogs are brought in regularly to Amazon's main campus where about 25,000 employees work,” according to CNBC. 

You could even say that modern workplaces have really... gone to the dogs (cue rimshot).

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Topics: Dog Training, Dog Safety, Behavior & Training, Puppy Training, Socialization, Benefits of training, Dog Tips, Pet Hazard, adult dog tips, puppy tips

Looking to keep your dog happy, healthy, and safe?

10 Tips eBook by Dr. Jason Nicholas

Take a look at these 10 Tips... your dog will thank you!

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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