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    Cranberry & Your Pet's Urinary Health — Miracle Berry or Just a Fad?


    Cranberry products — are they good for pets?

    Go to many of the popular pet blogs or pet supply stores these days and you’re likely to see cranberry-containing products touted and marketed with terms such as “urinary health” or “urinary care." But what’s the real deal with cranberry — is it really a “cure all” for your cat or dog’s urinary issues? Or does cranberry just have a good publicity agent?

    Let’s cut through the clutter (and fancy marketing terms) and explore the truth about the benefits of cranberry to urinary tract health for cats and dogs. If you really want to try using cranberry supplements for your pet, scroll further down for some product options to consider.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Dog Health, Dog, Blog, Urinary obstruction, UTI, Cat urine, Cat

    Catnip—What It Is and Why You Should Try It On Your Cat


    What is catnip?

    Though many cat owners are aware of catnip (sometimes called catmint), they don’t actually know what it is. So I thought I’d take a second to “pull back the curtain” and also share a couple of great uses for catnip with you.

    Catnip is actually a herb! It’s in the mint family and, if you’re interested, its scientific name is Nepeta cataria. Though it is native to parts of Asia and Europe, you can actually grow catnip yourself in indoor pots or in your garden. And though you could technically do so, I don’t actually recommend growing catnip in your window boxes. Its attractiveness to your cats could increase your cat’s risk of suffering a high-rise fall!

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Cat Stress, Blog, Urinary obstruction, Cat

    How Many Litter Boxes Does A Cat Need?


    Does your cat have enough litter boxes? Litter boxes are like good friends… you can never have too many of them. Well… maybe you could have too many litter boxes for your taste, but not for your cat's.

    There's a litter box rule of thumb: n+1In the veterinary profession we have a litter box "rule of thumb," it’s called the “n+1 rule.” And basically what it means is that you should have one more litter box than the number of cats you have.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Litter Box, Blog, Urinary obstruction, Cat Litter, Cat

    Cat Stress — The Signs To Look Out For


    Do You Have A Stressed Out Kitty?

    The days are long. The weather’s warm. And the kids are out of school. The middle of summer is often a great time to break out of your old routine and burn off some of that pent-up stress. But for most of our feline friends, routine is everything. And all these conditions that sound so ideal for you, can have quite the opposite effect on your cat. Heat, travel, and increased house traffic (especially younger children) can all lead to increasing their anxiety and stress levels. And a stressed cat can easily become an unhealthy cat. 

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Loss of appetite, Blog, Urinary obstruction, Itchy, Cat, Skin problems

    Panting In Cats – It May Not Be Normal


    What You Need To Know About Panting In Cats

    A few people recently asked whether it was normal for a cat to pant. We figured that if there's a few people asking about panting, then there’s likely a whole lot more that have wondered, too. So here’s the “skinny” on panting in cats…

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    Topics: Cat Health, Cat Stress, Cats, Pain, Diabetes, Cat Tips, Urinary obstruction

    Going to the Vet – How to Collect Your Cat's Urine Sample


    Is your cat peeing on your carpet? Are you noticing blood in her urine? Does she seem to be drinking or peeing a lot more lately? Or perhaps she appears to be losing weight, maybe even in spite of a healthy appetite? You likely (hopefully) recognize that all of these signs are indications that your cat needs to be seen by your veterinarian. But do you also know that you should be taking steps to ensure that she has a full bladder when she gets there?

    Liquid Gold — Making Your Cat Cross Their Legs Before Going to the Vet


    You see, whatever problem you’re bringing your cat to the vet for, or even when it’s just for a routine wellness check-up, that urine your cat is so cavalierly disposing of (even if on your carpets or laundry) could actually be the thing that helps your vet diagnose the underlying problem or, in the case of a wellness check-up, confirm their good health. In many situations, the importance of a urinalysis and/or a urine culture cannot be overstated. And since my super-intelligent friend and colleague, Dr. Ann Hohenhaus of The Animal Medical Center in New York City, wrote a great post on this very topic, I’ll leave it to her to explain all the information and value that we vets and pet owners get from a few simple urine tests.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Cats, Urine marking, Wellness Check-up, Vet Exam, Cat Tips, Urinary obstruction, Cat Litter, Veterinary visits, Urine sample, Collecting a urine sample, Blood in urine, Urine analysis

    Cats Hiding – Hide & Seek is a Bad Game


    Many cat owners don’t realize that hiding can be a very important and concerning sign in cats. Many just attribute it to grumpy feline behavior or their cat’s preference for dark, isolated places.

    Unfortunately though, hiding is often just an outward manifestation (sign) of an internal problem. And it’s a sign you should always be on the look out for and heed the warning of when it occurs. Read More

    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, Fleas on Cats, Signs of Stress in Cats, Cat Stress, Flea Bites, cat health questions, cat health issues, Pain, Urethral Obstruction, Arthritis in cats, Excessive grooming, Urinary obstruction, Digestive obstruction, Is my cat in pain, Kidney disease, Cat bite abcess, Cats Hiding

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.