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    Tooth Root Abscess – My cat's face is swollen


    When bacteria get to the root of your cat's teeth

    Many a cat is brought to the veterinary office because of a sudden swelling under one of their eyes, possibly accompanied by a decrease in their energy level and appetite. Though it’s not always the case, these swellings are often the result of a tooth root abscess — an infection that occurs at the base of the tooth, under the gumline.

    A tooth root abscess is easily confirmed on dental x-rays. An abscess happens when bacteria gain access to the deeper structures of the tooth, where the local environment can be ideal for bacterial growth. The infection causes inflammation and starts to erode the tooth structures.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, cat health questions, cat health issues, pet dental, Tooth problems, Dental for cats

    Tooth Resorption in Cats — When Good Cells Go Bad!


    Your pets — especially your cats — are susceptible to a painful dental condition called tooth resorption


    In this condition the multiple surfaces of a tooth are systematically destroyed (resorbed — "broken down and dissolved back into the body") by the cells of your pet's own body. The cells that are responsible for this destruction are called odontoclasts. These cells have a normal and healthy function within the body, but for some reason, in this disease state, they begin to exert their resorptive function in an abnormal way — resulting in the destruction of an otherwise apparently healthy and normal tooth (or teeth).

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    Topics: Cat Health, cat health issues, Cats, Blog, Tooth problems, Excessive drooling, Tooth absorption, Dental for cats

    5 (Non-Vaccine) Ways Your Cat Benefits From Regular Vet Check-ups


    "Do cats really need regular veterinary exams?"

    This is a question I get asked a lot. And there certainly are plenty of opinions and articles on both sides of the "debate." But there's at least one common thing both sides seem to agree on: vaccines. People talk and write about their necessity; the benefits or risks; or some other aspect of vaccines, vaccinations, or "shots."

    While I know that a conversation about vaccines is important, I believe that the specific focus on vaccines in the discussion about routine veterinary visits is, well… out of focus. And I believe that such a focus does a great disservice not just to your cat(s), but also to you. That's because there are many (often very passionate) thoughts and opinions about vaccines themselves, whether that's over the need, frequency, or other aspects of feline vaccines. Also, vaccines are never a "one-size-fits-all" topic. So, if you don't believe in vaccinating, then any article or discussion focusing on vaccines is going to immediately lose you. The problem is that these visits are about much more than just vaccines, and your cat might never receive the many other benefits of routine veterinary exams and care.

    I can assure you, as a veterinarian, that vet visits, check-ups, wellness exams, or whatever else you prefer to call them, truly are never just about vaccines. In fact, in a great many cases, they aren’t about vaccines at all!

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    Topics: Cat Health, Emergencies, Cancer in Cats, Diabetes in Cats, Kidney Failure, Cats, Vaccines, Diabetes, Blog, Hyperthyroidism, High blood pressure, Arrhythmia, Vet Exam, Tooth problems, Heart Murmurs, Wellness Checkup

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.