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    Is It Hard to Give Your Pet a Pill? – There Are Options


    Hard Pill to Swallow?

    Pills and capsules tend to be the mainstays of medicating cats and dogs. But what if your pooch or kitty is difficult to “pill?”

    Lots of dogs and many … most? … cats can be quite “unaccepting” of such forms of medications. So much so that a joke about the trials and tribulations of giving a cat a pill became a bit of a viral sensation. So what are you to do when Fluffy or Fido need meds?

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Dogs, medication, Cats, Dog Tips, Cat Tips

    Giving Your Cat a Pill – Make Sure To Chase It


    There are lots of joke posts about techniques and the difficulties of giving cats pills — this is a funny list. Maybe you've experienced some of these first hand? 

    One part of the process that is no joking matter though, and is often overlooked, is that you never want to have your cat do a “dry swallow.”

    "DRY SWALLOW"

    This is when you stuff the pill in the back of your cat’s mouth, close it, rub under their chin (or blow on their nose), and then call it done when the cat doesn’t spit the pill back out. 

    You should 100% always follow your cat’s pills up with some food, a few treats, or a syringe full of water (ask your vet for a syringe when getting your meds).

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    Topics: Cat Health, Cat Bite, medication, cat health issues, Cat Tips

    Lesser Known Pet Toxicities: Human Pain Relievers and Cats Don't Mix


    Accidental poisoning is one of the most common reasons people bring their pets in for an emergency veterinary visit or call animal poison control each year. Toxicity caused by human pain relievers is one of the most preventable pet toxicities. Just a little awareness and simple changes to routine will prevent the majority of pets from accessing and eating little pills. The toxic results of ingestion can include damaged red blood cells, gastrointestinal ulceration, and liver or kidney failure, among other things.

    Think about it — most of the time, pain relievers and supplements intended for people are found in medicine cabinets or personal bags and purses. It’s easy enough to hang bags and purses on a high hook instead of throwing them on a chair when you get home at night — that eliminates the opportunity for pets to access them there.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, toxicity in cats, medication, poison control center phone number, poison control number, medications, drugs, medicine, pet poison control free, poison control hotline, poison control center number, pet poison control, prescription drugs, Poison control, Poison control for cats, Blog

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.