<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1289632567801214&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
New Call-to-action

    Cat Spraying: Why They Do it and Ways to Tackle it


    You notice a wet spot on the side of the sofa, or the drapes, or maybe running down the front door. Hmmm, is that . . . ? Yep, it looks — and smells — like cat pee. Uh oh. What’s going on? Is your cat trying to tell you something?

    Actually, when your cat sprays, they are trying to send you (or another cat in or around your home) a message! It’s usually either, “I was here”/"this is my home,” or “I’m stressed out.”

    You see, spraying (or “marking”) is all about communication for cats. It’s different from fully peeing or pooping outside the litter box (a.k.a. “inappropriate toileting” or "inappropriate elimination") — which, though could also be due to stress or problems between the pets in your home, is most often related to a problem with your cat’s litter boxes (e.g., the type of litter used, the location or number of boxes available, or another of the common problems with litter box setup and maintenance). And, just to keep things interesting, both “spraying” and “inappropriate elimination” can also be brought on by, or worsened by, an underlying medical problem (e.g., arthritis, urinary tract inflammation (“cystitis”) or infection (“UTI”), kidney failure, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or a host of other problems). This article is going to focus on helping you with a cat that’s spraying or “marking.” Read on to see if that might be your cat, and what you can do about it.

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Aggression, Litter Box, Urine marking in cats, Cat behavior problems, Cat urine

    How to Clean Cat Pee and Poop Accidents


    Does it ever seem like your cat has an accident in one spot and keeps returning to the same spot? Well here's a fun fact: this isn’t their favorite spot to pee or poop. More likely than not, you didn’t clean up the last mess all the way, which is why they keep returning to the scene — or, more accurately, the scent — of the crime. 

    Read More

    Topics: Litter Box, Cats, Litterbox accidents, Cat pee, Pet cleaning supplies

    Litter Box 101: How to Choose the Best Litter Boxes for Your Cats and Why You Need To


    When you first get a cat, your next stop is usually the pet store for kitty supplies. A litter box is always at the top of that list, but few people give much thought to the box itself. 

    Looking at them, you might think that any one box is about the same as any other. However not all litter boxes are created equal; more to the point, not all litter boxes are created equal for all cats.

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Behavior, Litter Box, Litterbox accidents, Going outside the litterbox, Recommended cat litter, Is a covered litterbox a good idea

    How Many Litter Boxes Does A Cat Need?


    Does your cat have enough litter boxes? Litter boxes are like good friends… you can never have too many of them. Well… maybe you could have too many litter boxes for your taste, but not for your cat's.

    There's a litter box rule of thumb: n+1In the veterinary profession we have a litter box "rule of thumb," it’s called the “n+1 rule.” And basically what it means is that you should have one more litter box than the number of cats you have.

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Litter Box, Blog, Urinary obstruction, Cat Litter, Cat

    Cat Poop – How Often Should A Cat Go?


    Cat Poop Freqency

    Earlier this year when we asked for topics that you all wanted advice and insight on, quite a few people asked us (some variation of) this question… How often should my cat “go?”

    It’s an important question, and one that — of course — has a not-so-straightforward answer.

    As with many things about cats, there are several factors that will influence the answer. These factors include, amongst other things…

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Health, Litter Box, Cats, Cat Tips

    5 Lessons All Children Should Be Taught – and Shown – About Living With Cats


    Growing up with a cat has many well-documented benefits for your children. From a greater level of empathy and better social skills to a lower risk of allergies, growing up with cats can be great for your children. Along with all of the benefits though, come some dangers — both for the children and the cats.

    Whether you’re a parent, aunt/uncle, grandparent, or just a friend to someone with kids you need to stay aware and vigilant. Adult awareness can help prevent problems and ensure that the balance stays on the side of the benefits. Here are five crucial lessons that all children should be taught about living — or even just interacting — with cats.

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Safety, Children, Child Pet safety, Litter Box, Kittens, Cat Bite, Cat Body Language

    Top 10 Pet Proofing Tips for Cats and Kittens


    Bringing a new cat into your home is an exciting time. It’s an experience that everybody should have at least once in their lifetime. It’s important to remember a few practicalities though, in between all the fun and excitement. Some time spent pet-proofing with these simple steps will go a long way to help ensure that your new kitty stays with you – and stays safe and healthy – for many years to come.

    If you already have young (human) children, you may already have made a good amount of pet-proofing progress. But even if so, there are important differences in home safety needs between young children and young (or even older) cats. After all, we don’t expect too many infants or toddlers to chew on electric cords or grab the dental floss out of the bathroom wastebasket, but give a kitten the chance to do either and, more often than not, he’ll happily do so. So invest a bit of time now to evaluate (or reevaluate) the safety of your cat’s environment, and you can focus more on the fun and excitement in the days, months, and years to come. 

    Read More

    Topics: Kids and Cats, Scratches, New Kitten, High Rise Syndrome, Litter Box, Cat Bite

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.