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    Cranberry & Your Pet's Urinary Health — Miracle Berry or Just a Fad?


    Cranberry products — are they good for pets?

    Go to many of the popular pet blogs or pet supply stores these days and you’re likely to see cranberry-containing products touted and marketed with terms such as “urinary health” or “urinary care." But what’s the real deal with cranberry — is it really a “cure all” for your cat or dog’s urinary issues? Or does cranberry just have a good publicity agent?

    Let’s cut through the clutter (and fancy marketing terms) and explore the truth about the benefits of cranberry to urinary tract health for cats and dogs. If you really want to try using cranberry supplements for your pet, scroll further down for some product options to consider.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Dog Health, Dog, Blog, Urinary obstruction, UTI, Cat urine, Cat

    Scents That Could Be Harmful To Your Pets


    Use Caution With These Scents Around Your Pets

    If you plan to use any of the items listed below, please be aware and take the necessary precautions so that they don't wind up sickening or injuring your pets, or even worse.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Dog, Feline Asthma, Breathing problems, Cat, Harmful Scents, Bronchitis

    Is It Hard to Give Your Pet a Pill? – There Are Options


    Hard Pill to Swallow?

    Pills and capsules tend to be the mainstays of medicating cats and dogs. But what if your pooch or kitty is difficult to “pill?”

    Lots of dogs and many … most? … cats can be quite “unaccepting” of such forms of medications. So much so that a joke about the trials and tribulations of giving a cat a pill became a bit of a viral sensation. So what are you to do when Fluffy or Fido need meds?

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Dogs, medication, Cats, Dog Tips, Cat Tips

    Are Dented Pet Food Cans Safe?


    Botulism Is A Potential Risk

    You return home from the pet food store or your vet’s office with a case of your pet’s food only to realize something that you hadn’t realized when you first picked up the case… one (or several) of the cans is dented! You recall hearing something about Botulism and dented cans and wonder if the food in the dented can(s) is safe to feed to your dog or cat.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Dogs, Cats, Dog Food, Cat Tips, Pet food, Cat food

    Urinary Tract Infections in Cats and Dogs — Timing Your Dosages


    How can you make sure you're getting the most bang for your buck when giving your pet an antibiotic for their urinary tract infection?

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are common in both cats and dogs, and thus most pets will find themselves on an antibiotic to treat a UTI at some point in their life.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, medications, cat health issues, Blog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Urinary Tract Infection, UTI

    The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 11 - Cyclamen)


    DAY 11: Cyclamen

    I suspect this is a pet toxicity that many of you were unaware of. In fact, I suspect many of you have never even heard of a cyclamen before – right? However, you've likely seen them around and may have even had them on your holiday table – these plants are common in supermarket floral departments and home & garden centers.

    Although not nearly as popular as the poinsettia around the holidays, the cyclamen is often found in homes this time of year. And not many people know about the dangers of the cyclamen.
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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, Plants Poisonous for Cats, holiday pet safety tips, Poison control, Christmas pet hazards, Poinsettias, Plants Poisonous for Dogs, Cyclamen

    The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 6 - Ornaments)


    DAY 6: Ornaments & Other Tree Decorations

    From cuts on paws from those that break to gastrointestinal obstruction from those that get ingested, ornaments and other Christmas tree decorations pose a wide array of hazards to your pets. It’s this scope of problems and the prevalence of such decorations in homes this time of year that make Christmas tree decorations the 'poster children' for Day 6 of our The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, holiday pet safety tips, String, Dog Booties, Christmas pet hazards, Pet emergency, To pull or not to pull, Cats and string, Bandages, Use of bandages, Septic peritonitis

    The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 3 - Mistletoe)


    DAY 3: Mistletoe

    Before you pucker up to kiss your sweetheart, be sure that bunch of mistletoe is well secured to the door jam. Though a strategically placed sprig of mistletoe may get you that Christmas "snog" you've been dreaming about all year, it may also land your dog or cat in the hospital if it falls to the ground or they find another way to get their paws on it.

    Be aware

    Even when eaten in small quantities, mistletoe can cause your pets excessive drooling and digestive upset. The latter of which may manifest as vomiting and diarrhea - which kinda ruins the thought of the previously mentioned snog I guess, doesn't it? But even bigger problems are in store for your pet if they ingest a larger quantity of this common Christmas decoration.

    In these situations your pet may experience heart and/or neurologic problems, which could include abnormal heart rate and rhythm, decreased blood pressure, and a staggered walk. If left untreated, these signs can progress to collapse, seizures, coma, and even death. Now I've really ruined the thought of the snog, haven't I? I'm sorry, truly, I am... but you really should be aware of this.

    If your pet has ingested any quantity of mistletoe...

    ...you should seek immediate veterinary advice. You can do so from your regular veterinarian, the local Animal ER, or from a dedicated animal poison control hotline . Though severe toxicity from mistletoe is uncommon, many factors will influence the degree of toxicity your pet will experience should they be unfortunate enough to ingest it. And as with all potential or known toxicities, you should not delay in seeking professional veterinary advice. The sooner appropriate actions are taken, the greater the chances that a better outcome will be realized.

    Preventing mistletoe toxicity

    • If you hang mistletoe in your home, be sure it's well secured.
    • Take the berries off of any mistletoe you hang in your home.
    • Be careful when putting up (and taking down) your holiday decorations; do not leave the mistletoe laying around where your pets can get to it.
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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, Plants Poisonous for Cats, holiday pet safety tips, Vomiting, Poison control, Christmas pet hazards, Diarrhea, Neurological problems, Plants Poisonous for Dogs, Mistletoe

    The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 9 - Ribbons & Bows)


    DAY 9: Ribbons & Bows

    You’d be forgiven for thinking that curly ribbon and gift bows are good toys for your cats – after all, pictures and videos of playful cats rolling around with such objects can be found everywhere online, on television, and in print ads. But we in the veterinary profession also want pet owners to be aware that another place we commonly see kittens and cats playing with Christmas ribbons – or at least the debilitating and expensive results of such activities – is in the veterinary clinics and Animal ERs all across the country.

    This article will tell you what you need to know to recognize, react, and prevent this common holiday pet hazard. So dig in, read on, and don’t forget to share this information with your friends and family.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, holiday pet safety tips, Vomiting, Christmas pet hazards, Pet safety and houseguests, Linear Foreign Body, Cats and string, Diarrhea, Hiding, Septic peritonitis

    ‘Fat Cat’ & ‘Portly Pooch’ - it can cost your pet (and you) dearly

    What do you think about your pet’s weight? Be honest. Do you think that they’re an appropriate weight? Do you think they’re too thin? Too heavy?

    Would it surprise you to learn that nearly 50% of the dogs, and nearly 60% of the cats in America are overweight or obese? This is according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, and based upon the results of their most recent (2009) National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Study. What is perhaps even sadder, and will make the problem that much more difficult to combat, is that 33% of the dog owners in the survey incorrectly believed that their overweight pooch was actually at a healthy weight. For cat owners, this percentage was even higher at 46%. And when it came to obese pets, defined as a pet being at least 30% heavier than what their normal weight should be, owner’s perceptions weren’t much better - 25% of dog owners, and 40% of cat owners, got it wrong there too.

    Why should you care?

    Why is this important? Because excess weight on pets doesn’t just worsen their arthritis and slow them down, it can have significant financial and medical implications in the event of an emergency or illness as well. This translates to more debilitation and longer hospital stays for them, and more inconvenience and higher costs for you!

    Take ‘Dave’ for example…
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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Cat Diet, Fat Cat, Overweight Cat, Overweight Dog, Dog DIet, Fat Dog

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.