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    Cat Spraying: Why They Do it and Ways to Tackle it


    You notice a wet spot on the side of the sofa, or the drapes, or maybe running down the front door. Hmmm, is that . . . ? Yep, it looks — and smells — like cat pee. Uh oh. What’s going on? Is your cat trying to tell you something?

    Actually, when your cat sprays, they are trying to send you (or another cat in or around your home) a message! It’s usually either, “I was here”/"this is my home,” or “I’m stressed out.”

    You see, spraying (or “marking”) is all about communication for cats. It’s different from fully peeing or pooping outside the litter box (a.k.a. “inappropriate toileting” or "inappropriate elimination") — which, though could also be due to stress or problems between the pets in your home, is most often related to a problem with your cat’s litter boxes (e.g., the type of litter used, the location or number of boxes available, or another of the common problems with litter box setup and maintenance). And, just to keep things interesting, both “spraying” and “inappropriate elimination” can also be brought on by, or worsened by, an underlying medical problem (e.g., arthritis, urinary tract inflammation (“cystitis”) or infection (“UTI”), kidney failure, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or a host of other problems). This article is going to focus on helping you with a cat that’s spraying or “marking.” Read on to see if that might be your cat, and what you can do about it.

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    Topics: Cat Aggression, Litter Box, Urine marking in cats, Cat behavior problems, Cat urine

    Cranberry & Your Pet's Urinary Health — Miracle Berry or Just a Fad?


    Cranberry products — are they good for pets?

    Go to many of the popular pet blogs or pet supply stores these days and you’re likely to see cranberry-containing products touted and marketed with terms such as “urinary health” or “urinary care." But what’s the real deal with cranberry — is it really a “cure all” for your cat or dog’s urinary issues? Or does cranberry just have a good publicity agent?

    Let’s cut through the clutter (and fancy marketing terms) and explore the truth about the benefits of cranberry to urinary tract health for cats and dogs. If you really want to try using cranberry supplements for your pet, scroll further down for some product options to consider.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, Dog Health, Dog, Blog, Urinary obstruction, UTI, Cat urine, Cat

    Your Cat Is Thirsty – Find Out Why


    Reasons Why Your Cat May Be So Thirsty

    An increase in thirst is quite a common thing for cat owners to mention during vet visits. Of course, it’s also common for them to miss the increased thirst, but bring up the other “end” of the issue… increased urinations.

    Were you aware though that there are actually many potential causes of increased thirst and/or urinations in cats? These can include:

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    Topics: Diabetes in Cats, Overweight Cat, Blog, Outdoor cats, Indoor cats, Ketones, Water, Thyroid Gland, Cat urine

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.