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    Urinary Tract Infections in Cats and Dogs — Timing Your Dosages


    How can you make sure you're getting the most bang for your buck when giving your pet an antibiotic for their urinary tract infection?

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are common in both cats and dogs, and thus most pets will find themselves on an antibiotic to treat a UTI at some point in their life.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, medications, cat health issues, Blog, Dog Tips, Cat Tips, Urinary Tract Infection, UTI

    Miliary Dermatitis – Those Bumps On Your Cat's Back


    What are these bumps on my cat's back?

    Though it happens throughout the year, now is the time when we vets start seeing a lot more cats with "bumpy backs." These small bumps and scabs, also common around a cat’s neck and face, are what's called “miliary dermatitis.”

    This inflammatory process of the skin is typically accompanied by itchiness, which cats often express by scratching and/or biting at their skin (although you may not actually see them doing so). Until proven otherwise, miliary dermatitis in cats is an indication of the presence of, and potentially allergic reaction to, fleas.

    Because miliary dermatitis is an uncomfortable condition for cats, and because it most often indicates a flea problem, this is a finding that should prompt a visit to your veterinarian. To learn more about fleas read this article about fleas and their treatment and prevention on cats.

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    Topics: Cat Health, Fleas on Cats, Flea Allergies, Dermatitis, cat health questions, cat health issues, Skin irritation, Itchiness

    Giving Your Cat a Pill – Make Sure To Chase It


    There are lots of joke posts about techniques and the difficulties of giving cats pills — this is a funny list. Maybe you've experienced some of these first hand? 

    One part of the process that is no joking matter though, and is often overlooked, is that you never want to have your cat do a “dry swallow.”

    "DRY SWALLOW"

    This is when you stuff the pill in the back of your cat’s mouth, close it, rub under their chin (or blow on their nose), and then call it done when the cat doesn’t spit the pill back out. 

    You should 100% always follow your cat’s pills up with some food, a few treats, or a syringe full of water (ask your vet for a syringe when getting your meds).

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    Topics: Cat Health, Cat Bite, medication, cat health issues, Cat Tips

    Cat Acne – How To Curtail Breakouts


    Have you ever noticed little bumps or “blackheads” on your cat’s chin? Perhaps they’ve even progressed to full fledged “zits” by the time you’ve noticed them? These signs are often, though not always, an indication of what’s commonly referred to as “chin acne” in cats.


    For deeper or more persistent cases, you’ll need to see your vet for safe and effective treatment. However, for mild cases of chin acne, simple cleaning at home and some changes to your cat’s meal time routine may just do the trick.

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    Topics: Cat Health, cat health issues, Cat Tips, Cat acne, Water Bowls, Feeding Bowls

    Tooth Resorption in Cats — When Good Cells Go Bad!


    Your pets — especially your cats — are susceptible to a painful dental condition called tooth resorption


    In this condition the multiple surfaces of a tooth are systematically destroyed (resorbed — "broken down and dissolved back into the body") by the cells of your pet's own body. The cells that are responsible for this destruction are called odontoclasts. These cells have a normal and healthy function within the body, but for some reason, in this disease state, they begin to exert their resorptive function in an abnormal way — resulting in the destruction of an otherwise apparently healthy and normal tooth (or teeth).

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    Topics: Cat Health, cat health issues, Cats, Blog, Tooth problems, Excessive drooling, Tooth absorption, Dental for cats

    Cats and String - To Pull or Not To Pull?


    Something stuck in your cat's butt? 
    Whether it's string, yarn, dental floss, the trussing from your holiday turkey or tinsel from a Christmas tree, anything that's protruding from your cat's butt is of concern.

    "To pull or not to pull?" – that is the question


    If an accident happens and your cat does ingest something, “to pull or not to pull?” is the question that so many people ask. This is, of course, in reference to what action you should take should you notice something sticking out of your cat’s butt.

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, Cat Stress, cat health issues, String, Blog, Cat Tips, Digestive obstruction, Is my cat in pain, To pull or not to pull, Linear Foreign Body, Cats and string, Something is stuck in my cat's butt

    Cats Hiding – Hide & Seek is a Bad Game


    Many cat owners don’t realize that hiding can be a very important and concerning sign in cats. Many just attribute it to grumpy feline behavior or their cat’s preference for dark, isolated places.

    Unfortunately though, hiding is often just an outward manifestation (sign) of an internal problem. And it’s a sign you should always be on the look out for and heed the warning of when it occurs. Read More

    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, Fleas on Cats, Signs of Stress in Cats, Cat Stress, Flea Bites, cat health questions, cat health issues, Pain, Urethral Obstruction, Arthritis in cats, Excessive grooming, Urinary obstruction, Digestive obstruction, Is my cat in pain, Kidney disease, Cat bite abcess, Cats Hiding

    Cat Litter & Asthma - Yours & Your Cat's


    If you have asthmatic cats, asthmatic kids, have asthma yourself, or simply have a cat this article is for you.

    Did you know that the type of cat litter you use can have a significant impact on the comfort and safety of those suffering with asthma?

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    Topics: Cat Health, cat health problem, cat health questions, cat health issues, Blog, Litterbox, Cat litterbox, Asthma in cats, Litterbox dust, Sodium bentonite cat litter, FAB, Clay litter dust, Feline allergic bronchitis, Low dust cat litter, Silica gel in cat litter, No-dust cat litter, Does cat litter cause asthma, Recommended cat litter, Silica dust, Is a covered litterbox a good idea, Cat Litter

    How Cats Eating Crayons Can Save You Time, Frustration, and Money


    Whose poop is this anyway...

    One of the more frustrating things that cats can do in a home is defecating outside of their litterbox—not just directly next to it, but sometimes in a completely separate room. And especially if it's diarrhea they're having!

    This frustration for pet owners is understandable, but it’s important to recognize that such activity can have several potential underlying reasons—which rarely, if ever, include “spiting you.”

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, cat health questions, cat health issues, Blog, Litterbox accidents, Crayon Shavings, Arthritis in cats, Cats and crayons, Litterbox, Going outside the litterbox, Multi-cat household

    How Can I Tell If My Cat Is In Pain?


    As a general rule, most cats are excellent at hiding their pain. Fortunately, there are lots of signs you can look for that indicate possible pain in your cat. Know what to look for so you can prevent your cat from suffering in silence.

    Cats are masters at disguising pain. It's a survival instinct.

     

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    Topics: Cat Health, cat health issues, Cats, Pain, Signs of Pain, Warning Signs, Blog

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.