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    Shopping List: Help Your New Cat Settle In Easier


    Bringing a new cat into your home is a fantastic thing! You're going to have such a fun time together!

    But given that it's likely to be a big change for your kitty, regardless of where you got them from, don't be too surprised if they don't blend and settle in right away.

    All cats go through some sort of an "adjustment period" when first arriving in a new home.

    This is when they're becoming familiar with their new surroundings and family members and figuring out how they fit into it all. How long any cat's "adjustment period" is depends on the cat, the home, and a host of other factors.

    Thankfully, there are some things you can do and some products you can have on hand to help ease your new cat's transition and help them feel more "at home" and comfortable in your home.

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    Topics: New Kitten, Scratching, Cat Treats, Cat-friendly products, Cat training, feline behavior, litter box training

    Mittens from Kittens — a short movie for the DIY cat crowd


    Some cat owners have made peace with the never-ending strands of cat hair floating into every pot on the stove, creeping into every closed drawer, and strewn about the car they have never been in without a carrier. Others have decided to be more productive with this nuisance of an accessory, by giving it a purpose and turning it into a craft.

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    Topics: Cat Tips, Indoor cats, Review, Cat-friendly products, DIY, At the Mewvies

    Arthritis and Other Mobility Issues in Older Cats — How You Can Help


    Arthritis in Cats: FAR More Common Than You Think

    Thanks to advancements in medicine and nutrition, as well as important improvements in the way we view and look after our cats, our feline friends are living longer, fuller lives these days.

    However, as cats progress into their senior years, it’s common for many of them to develop joint pain and problems, such as arthritis. And it's actually not all that uncommon even for younger cats to develop and suffer from arthritis.

    One study found that roughly 30% of cats over the age of 8 suffer from arthritis — and eight isn't very old for a cat! Another study of cats 6 years and older found that 61% of them had radiographic signs of arthritis in at least one joint - even though many of them weren't showing any obvious outward signs of their arthritis!

    And yet another study found that 90% of cats aged 12 and over showed radiographic (x-ray) signs of arthritis — that's 9 out of every 10 cats over the age of 12! These are very significant numbers, especially when we also take into account that the pain and suffering that these cats are experiencing often goes undetected and therefore untreated, even by the most caring and attentive of cat owners.

    Wondering if your cat might have arthritis? Have a look at and complete this helpful "Does My Cat Have Arthritis" questionnaire from the cat pain gurus at North Carolina State University's College of Veterinary Medicine. Share your results with your veterinarian so they can help you interpret them and determine if your cat is likely to be suffering from arthritis.

    If your cat does have arthritis, there are fortunately some simple things you can do to help improve their comfort, mobility, and quality of life. Many of the things you can do to help your cat are inexpensive and easy to implement. Of course, many cats will also benefit from a pain management protocol involving safe and effective medications, supplements, and complimentary treatments (e.g. acupuncture, etc.) determined by your veterinarian. Read on to see what you can do to help your arthritic cat — regardless of their age.

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    Topics: Cat Health, medication, Cats, Pain, Arthritis in cats, Mobility, Aging, Cat-friendly products

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.