<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1289632567801214&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
New Call-to-action

    Cat Spraying: Why They Do it and Ways to Tackle it


    You notice a wet spot on the side of the sofa, or the drapes, or maybe running down the front door. Hmmm, is that . . . ? Yep, it looks — and smells — like cat pee. Uh oh. What’s going on? Is your cat trying to tell you something?

    Actually, when your cat sprays, they are trying to send you (or another cat in or around your home) a message! It’s usually either, “I was here”/"this is my home,” or “I’m stressed out.”

    You see, spraying (or “marking”) is all about communication for cats. It’s different from fully peeing or pooping outside the litter box (a.k.a. “inappropriate toileting” or "inappropriate elimination") — which, though could also be due to stress or problems between the pets in your home, is most often related to a problem with your cat’s litter boxes (e.g., the type of litter used, the location or number of boxes available, or another of the common problems with litter box setup and maintenance). And, just to keep things interesting, both “spraying” and “inappropriate elimination” can also be brought on by, or worsened by, an underlying medical problem (e.g., arthritis, urinary tract inflammation (“cystitis”) or infection (“UTI”), kidney failure, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or a host of other problems). This article is going to focus on helping you with a cat that’s spraying or “marking.” Read on to see if that might be your cat, and what you can do about it.

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Aggression, Litter Box, Urine marking in cats, Cat behavior problems, Cat urine

    Feeders for Multi-Cat Households and Tips for Feeding Multiple Cats


    If you have more than one cat, feedings can get rather interesting. You might even say it feels like… herding cats (*ba dum tsss*).

    Some cats need to eat more, some less. Some might have a special diet. Some might be grazers, while others like to hoover their food up all at once. Regardless of your particular combination of kitty eating needs or styles, it’s important to know how to approach meal time with multiple cats so that every cat gets enough to eat, but not too much; and eats what they’re supposed to eat, but not what they’re not. If you’ve ever had to juggle different types of foods or quantities of food for multiple cats, you’ve probably felt the stress that comes with it.

    Good news though! You’re not alone, and the trials and tribulations we here at Preventive Vet, as well as other cat owners, have endured means that we’ve got some good tips and even different feeding and “feeder” options that can help you de-complicate your multi-kitty meal time. Won’t that be nice!

    Read More

    Topics: Cat Aggression, Feeding Bowls, Cat food

    Cat Aggression: Why They Strike and How to Stop It


    If you have an aggressive cat, life can get rough.

    While aggression in cats is tough on you, it may be even tougher on your cat. Identifying the root cause of the aggression and taking steps to alleviate the situation could lessen the aggressive behavior or eliminate it all together.

    The first step to take when you notice aggression in your cat is to visit your veterinarian. There are many underlying medical issues that can cause aggression, including elevated thyroid levels and joint, muscle or stomach pain.

    A veterinarian may take a blood sample, x-rays, an ultrasound, or run other tests to rule out any medical issues. Once those are ruled out, you can implement behavior modification strategies and start making environmental changes to see results.

    Read More

    Topics: Territorial Aggression in Cats, Fear Based Aggression in Cats, Play Aggression in Cats, Cat Aggression, Sudden Aggression in Cats, Redirected Aggresion in Cats, Aggession in Cats

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.