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    Arthritis and Other Mobility Issues in Older Cats — How You Can Help


    Arthritis in Cats: More Common Than You Think

    Thanks to advancements in medicine and nutrition, as well as important improvements in the way we view and look after our cats, our feline friends are living longer, fuller lives these days. However, as cats progress into their senior years, it’s common for many of them to develop joint pain and problems, such as arthritis.

    A study found that roughly 30% of cats over the age of 8 suffer from arthritis — and eight isn't very old for a cat! Another study found that 90% of cats aged 12 and over showed radiographic (x-ray) signs of the arthritis — that's 9 out of every 10 cats over the age of 12! These are very significant numbers, especially when we also take into account that the pain and suffering that these cats are experiencing often goes undetected and therefore untreated, even by the most caring and attentive of cat owners. (Here are some things you can look for to help you determine if your cat might be suffering in silence from the pain of arthritis, or any other painful condition.)

    Fortunately, there are some simple things you can do to help improve the comfort, mobility, and quality of life for your cats with arthritis. Many of the things you can do to help your cat are inexpensive and easy to implement. Of course, many cats will also benefit from a pain management protocol involving safe and effective medications, supplements, and complimentary treatments (e.g. acupuncture, etc.) determined by your veterinarian. Read on to see what you can do to help your arthritic cat — regardless of their age.

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    Topics: Cat Health, medication, Cats, Pain, Arthritis in cats, Mobility, Aging, Cat-friendly products

    Bath Time! Why and How You Should Bathe Your Cat


    Giving a cat a bath...

    Though you likely wouldn’t put the words “cat” and “bath” together in the same sentence (unless it also included the word “never!”), bathing a cat can be done — some actually like it, and sometimes it's a necessity.

    Why might you have to bathe a cat?

    Since most cats, in most situations, are quite fastidious in their grooming practices there aren’t many reasons why you’d need to bathe your cat. However, there are a few scenarios where you might find yourself needing to do so.

    RingwormThis is actually a fungus, rather than a worm. Depending on the severity of your cat’s case, and some other factors, your vet may prescribe medicated baths.

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    Topics: Cat Safety, Flea Allergies, flea shampoo, Cats, Obesity, Blog, Arthritis in cats, Cat Tips, Giving a cat a bath, Ringworm, How to bathe a cat

    Cats Hiding – Hide & Seek is a Bad Game


    Many cat owners don’t realize that hiding can be a very important and concerning sign in cats. Many just attribute it to grumpy feline behavior or their cat’s preference for dark, isolated places.

    Unfortunately though, hiding is often just an outward manifestation (sign) of an internal problem. And it’s a sign you should always be on the look out for and heed the warning of when it occurs. Read More

    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, Fleas on Cats, Signs of Stress in Cats, Cat Stress, Flea Bites, cat health questions, cat health issues, Pain, Urethral Obstruction, Arthritis in cats, Excessive grooming, Urinary obstruction, Digestive obstruction, Is my cat in pain, Kidney disease, Cat bite abcess, Cats Hiding

    How Cats Eating Crayons Can Save You Time, Frustration, and Money


    Whose poop is this anyway...

    One of the more frustrating things that cats can do in a home is defecating outside of their litterbox—not just directly next to it, but sometimes in a completely separate room. And especially if it's diarrhea they're having!

    This frustration for pet owners is understandable, but it’s important to recognize that such activity can have several potential underlying reasons—which rarely, if ever, include “spiting you.”

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    Topics: Cat Behavior, Cat Health, cat health problem, cat health questions, cat health issues, Blog, Litterbox accidents, Crayon Shavings, Arthritis in cats, Cats and crayons, Litterbox, Going outside the litterbox, Multi-cat household

    Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

    Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

    Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you've learned that you'd like to share with others.