Rodenticide Poisoning In Cats & Dogs—Why The Type Matters


Not all rat and mouse poisons kill the same way

Many cats and dogs are brought into veterinary hospitals in the fall and winter after having gotten into a rat/mouse poison (“rodenticides”). After all, this is a common time of year for rats and mice to try and seek shelter in people’s homes and businesses, so it’s a common time of year for people to be putting out rat and mouse poisons.

While most people know that rat and mouse poisons are dangerous for cats and dogs, what many people don’t realize is that not all rodenticides work (kill) the same way. Because of this, it’s vitally important that you pay attention to what you and your neighbors are putting in and around your homes, and that the veterinary staff or the people at animal poison control are told (or better still, shown) which rodenticide your pet got into if exposure happens.

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Safety, Dog Health, Cat Safety, toxicity, Poison control, Blog, Outdoor cats, Dogs Outdoors

Snail & Slug Bait – Bad For Pets – What You Can Use In Your Garden Instead


Like to garden? Hate snails and slugs? Have pets?
Read this...

Most snail and slug poisons contain a compound called metaldehyde, which is also extremely poisonous to cats and dogs. Metaldehyde kills snails and slugs by causing them to dehydrate (it does this both by disturbing their ability to produce their protective mucus coating and by causing them to swell). In cats and dogs it has a much different effect, an effect which can be quite devastating and even fatal!

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Topics: toxicity, travel with pets, Snails, Outdoor cats, Dogs Outdoors, Dog-friendly products

My Dog Ate Xylitol: What Should I Do and Who Should I Tell?


Xylitol is Poisonous to Dogs

As xylitol is being used in an increasingly wide range and number of products, more and more dogs are getting sick from eating this “all natural” sugar substitute.

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Topics: Dog Health, toxicity, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Poison control

Sago Palms – Extremely Dangerous For Cats and Dogs!


Sago Palms are EXTREMELY dangerous for cats and dogs!

If you aren’t already aware, I highly recommend you take a moment to learn about Sago Palms and the (very serious) danger they pose to your pets. And I would definitely encourage you to also share this article with your pet-loving friends and family — as they are likely unaware, too.

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Topics: poisonous plants for dogs, poisonous plants for cats, toxicity, pet poison control, Dog, Vomiting, Blog, Seizures, Diarrhea, Cat

Xylitol: The "sugar-free" sweetener your dog NEEDS you to know about


Xylitol: More Dangerous Than Chocolate, Yet Less Well Known About

Do you know what xylitol is? Are you (fully) aware of the danger it poses to dogs? You wouldn’t be alone if you answered “no” to either, or even both of these questions. In our ongoing Pet Safety Awareness survey over 50% of the respondents weren’t aware of xylitol or the danger it poses to dogs until they took the survey! By comparison, you’d be hard pressed to find a dog owner who isn’t aware that chocolate can be toxic to dogs. Right?

Yet xylitol can be far-more-dangerous to dogs than chocolate! The picture below shows the minimum amount of dark chocolate that could cause death in three different weights of dog — compared to the minimum number of pieces of xylitol-containing sugar free gum that could have the same devastating effect.

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Topics: Dog Safety, toxicity, Dog Emergency, Xylitol Dogs, Xylitol Gum, Xylitol, Xylitol Products, Is Xylitol Safe, Blog, Seizures, Liver Failure, Hypoglycemia

The 12 Days of Christmas: Pet Hazards Series (Day 12 - Houseguests)


Day 12: Houseguests

I know, it seems a bit curmudgeonly to declare “houseguests” as a pet hazard. After all, it's Christmas! And isn't this holiday about nothing else if not spending it with friends, family, and loved ones?

It is indeed — both for you and your pets. From the perspective of the health and safety of your pets though, it truly is important for you to be aware of all the dangers that your friends, family members, and other loved ones will most certainly (albeit inadvertently) expose your pets to during this year’s Christmas festivities.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety, toxicity, Xylitol, holiday pet safety tips, Hepatic Lipidosis, Vomiting, Poison control, Christmas pet hazards, Pet safety and houseguests, Diarrhea, Batteries

Rat & Mouse Baits—Dangerous For Cats & Dogs... Know the signs


Many cats and dogs will be the first to take the bait

Each autumn and winter, there is a concerning rise of dog and cat poisonings due to rat and mouse poisons (rodenticides) that are seen in veterinary hospitals and animal ERs throughout the world.

With the declining temperatures and summer’s food bounty going away, rats and mice start seeking shelter and food in our homes, garages, sheds, and barns. To combat them, many people will put out rodenticides - chemicals and “baits” designed to kill rats and mice.

Unfortunately, cats and dogs will often be the first to take the bait. And as if that weren't enough, they can also be affected by eating poisoned rodents! Signs of rodenticide toxicity can be seen within hours to days, depending on the type of rodenticide used. Common clinical signs include:

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Topics: Dog Safety, Cat Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, toxicity in cats, Dog Emergency, Kidney Failure, poison control for dogs, Cat Emergency, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control, Poison control for cats, Breathing problems, Seizures, Rat Bait, Lethargy, Internal Bleeding, Coughing, Rodenticides, Vomitting

Lesser Known Pet Toxicities: Human Pain Relievers and Dogs Don't Mix


Nobody likes to see their dog in pain

Since lots of dogs unfortunately suffer from arthritis and other painful conditions (not sure if your dog is one - here's some ways to help know if your dog is painful) and nobody likes to see their dog in pain, accidental poisoning is one of the most common reasons people bring their pets in for an emergency veterinary visit or call animal poison control each year. Toxicity caused by human pain relievers is one of the most preventable pet toxicities. Just a little awareness and simple changes to routine will prevent the majority of pets from accessing and eating little pills. The toxic results of ingestion can include damaged red blood cells, gastrointestinal ulceration, and liver or kidney failure, among other things.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, medication, poison control center phone number, poison control number, medications, poison control for dogs, drugs, medicine, pet poison control free, poison control hotline, poison control center number, pet poison control, dog poison control, prescription drugs, Toxicity in dogs, Poison control

Chocolate: The Most Well-Known-About, Yet Still Common, Dog Toxin

Most pet owners already know that chocolate is bad for dogs. In fact, so many people are aware of this common toxicity that veterinary hospitals across the country regularly receive phone calls from pet owners concerned because they realized their pet just ate some chocolate – even if that pet is a 65-pound Labrador Retriever that just ate a few M&Ms.

So in this article, we won’t focus on the fact that chocolate is bad for pets – you (hopefully) already know that. We’re going to focus on why chocolate is toxic, which types of chocolates are the worst, and what signs you should look for in the event you suspect chocolate toxicity.

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Topics: Dog Safety, Dog Health, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, chocolate toxicity dogs, dog chocolate toxicity, canine chocolate toxicity, dogs chocolate toxicity, dark chocolate toxicity in dogs, chocolate dogs toxicity, chocolate toxicity, holiday pet safety tips, dogs and chocolate toxicity, chocolate toxicity in dogs

Lesser Known Pet Toxicities: Grape, Raisin, and Currant Toxicity in Dogs

Grapes could be one of the scariest toxins for dogs because of the perceived ‘health’ of offering fruit as a treat. While grapes, raisins, and the related Zante currant are perfectly healthy snacks for us humans, they can be kidney-destroying, and therefore life-threatening, to some dogs.

At this point, we don’t know exactly what makes these foods toxic, and we don’t know exactly the number of grapes, raisins, or currants that must be eaten before a dog shows signs of toxicity. Also, it appears that not all dogs are susceptible to this toxicity, and there are currently no ways to predict which dogs are, and which aren’t. What we do know is that, in susceptible dogs, the ingestion of these common ‘people snacks’ can cause acute kidney failure. Kidney failure is an expensive condition to treat, and can cause long-term consequences – even death. So, while we in the veterinary world may not yet know everything there is to know about grape, raisin, and currant toxicity in dogs, we do know enough to strongly recommend that people never knowingly feed grapes, raisins, or currants to their dogs and that they take all reasonable and necessary steps to prevent their dog’s accidental exposure to them as well.

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Topics: Dog Safety, pet safety tips, pet safety, toxicity, Kids and Pets, Dogs, Are Grapes Safe for Dogs, Grape Toxicity, Are Raisins Safe for Dogs, Currants, What are Good Training Treats for Dogs, Are Currants Safe for Dogs, Food, Blog, Foods that aren't good for dogs

Photo Credit: Preventive Vet

Please do not ask emergency or other specific medical questions about your pets in the blog comments. As an online informational resource, Preventive Vet is unable to and does not provide specific medical advice or counseling. A thorough physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinary-patient-client relationship is required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet is having an emergency or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic medical conditions, please contact or visit your veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

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